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Women's Trade Union League.
     Union Labor Advocate (Chicago).
September 1904 - December 1910
Collection IX: Women's Trade Union League Publications; The Chicago Union Labor Advocate was a monthly magazine, privately published but closely tied to the local labor movement. During the first decade of the twentieth century it was the official organ of the Chicago Federation of Labor and of other labor bodies. Receptive to the cause of women, it ran a Woman's Department and reported the organization of the National Women's Trade Union League in late 1903 and of its Chicago branch in January 1904.Beginning with the issue of December 1904, the Chicago Women's Trade Union League assumed responsibility for the Advocate's Woman's Department, with Anna Nicholes, the League's secretary, as editor. Meanwhile the National WTUL came increasingly to feel the need of its own channel of communication. In 1908 the executive board voted to make the Woman's Department its first official organ. With the National headquarters located in Chicago, the transition was an easy one. A recently arrived Australian journalist, Alice Henry, took over an expanded Woman's Department in May 1908. Under her editorship, the department continued to the end of 1910, by which point the League was ready to launch a full-fledged magazine of its own, Life and Labor. (See Reels 5 and 6.)Since the Union Labor Advocate reflects some of the progressive spirit of the Chicago labor movement during the formative years of the Women's Trade Union League, it seemed useful to film the magazine in its entirety and not merely the Woman's Department. The file has been assembled from the holdings of three libraries: the University of Florida Library, Columbia University Library, and the Littauer Library of Harvard University. It begins at the start of Volume 5, in September 1904, a few issues before the Chicago branch of the Women's Trade Union League took over the Woman's Department, and continues through the final WTUL issue of December 1910. Library holdings of the Advocate are few and sparse, but the file assembled here lacks only three issues, those of February, March, and April 1906.A printed index to the material in the Woman's Department for the years 1907-10 can be found at the beginning of Reel 3.
     Reel: 2; 3; 4

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Source Citation: Women's Trade Union League and Its Leaders

Page: 122