BABREN, Najor B.

witness to an agreement between the Menominee and the

Indians of New York purchasing lands Sept. 23, 1822;

documents enclosed in the treaty with the Menomenee.

Feb. 8, 1831

BABY, Mr.

Canadian tribes accuse Colonel Alex McKee of favoring

certain tribes and wish Mr. Baby to replace him.

Feb. 6-10, 1794

BACKSINOSA. See PAXINOSA.

BACON'S REBELLION

used as ån example in the discussions about limiting

passage of Indians into Virginia; Treaty between the

Governors of New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania

and the Five Nations. Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

allusion made to Bacon's Rebellion. Mar. 3, 1730

BAJRE, Michael

present at council to discuss peace between Six Nations

and Cherokee. Mar. 7-12, 1768

BALFOUR,

Captain in Gage's regiment at Treaty at Detroit. Sept.

9-17, 1761

BALLARD, Thomas B.

witness to the Treaty at Camp Holmes. Aug. 24, 1835

BALTIMORE, Lord

renouncing of claims before Lord Baltimore. June 30,

1744

sent agents to council at Albany to renew Covenant

Chain with Five Nations. July 30-Aug. 6, 1684

willing to renounce claim to Lord Baltimore. June 25-

July 3, 1744

BALTIMORE, COUNCIL IN

council held at house of Colonel George Wells in

Baltimore county with Sinwica (Senecas). Apr. 16,

1685

BANCKER, Adrien, Jr.

a proprietor of the Kayaderosseras Patent. July 13,

1768

BANCKER, Evert

a proprietor of the Kayaderosseras Patent. July 13,

1768

BANCKER, Gerard

witness for the councils Feb. 25, 1789 in Albany. Apr.

19, 1793

BANCKER, Richard

a proprietor of the Kayaderosseras Patent. July 13,

1768

BANDY LEGS. See AGUEIA.

BANGAR, William

attested document. Nov. 2, 1753

BANKER, Evert

Alderman for the city of Albany, present at a council

between Governor Slaughter and a delegation of Mohawk

Praying Indians. May 26, 1691

present at the answer delivered by Governor Slaughter

to the Christian Mohawks. May 26, 1691 (II)

present at councils in Albany. May 26, 1691 (III),

(IV) & (V); June 1, 1691 (II); Sept. 4, 1691;

June 6, 1692 (II); Aug. 28, 1695; Sept. 18-19, 1695;

Oct. 19, 1695; Mar. 9-12, 1697; June 9, 1697 (II)

July 14, 1709; July 17-19, 1709; Aug. 12, 1709;

Oct. 16, 1721; Sept., 1722; Dec. 4, 1726

Alderman for the city of Albany, present at a council

with the Five Nations. June 1, 1691

present at a council in Albany with Senecas and Mohawks.

Sept. 2-4, 1691

present at a council with Five Nations representatives.

June 6, 1692

present for part of a council in Albany. Feb. 2-9, 1694

present at councils with Six Nations in Albany. Mar.

28, 1694 (IX): Sept. 21, 1722

present at a council with Five Nations in Albany. July

31-Aug. 10, 1696

co-author of a special motion at a council in Albany

with Five Nations. Sept. 17-Oct. 9-1696

present at councils with Onondagas in Albany. June 9,

1697

present at a council in Albany to receive propositions

from Onnondaga Sachems. June 9, 1697 (III)

involved in a fraudulent land purchase from several

Mohawk. May 31, 1698

named a commissioner. Sept. 14, 1698

indicated by Henry as involved in taking Mohawk lands.

Oct. 17, 1700

present at councils in Albany-Schenectady. July 16,

1710

BANT

maybe Bunt 7; French invitation delivered at Onondaga.

June 12-16, 1753

BANTON, John

a member of the Committee of the House of Representatives

of Pennsylvania, present at a conference at Harris

Ferry, Lancaster. Mar. 29-May 21, 1757

BANYAR, George

attesting proceedings of councils in New York City.

June 12-16, 1753

present as a secretary at councils in Albany. July 22,

1754

Deputy Secretary of New York qualified credentials of

delegates to the councils in Albany. Aug. 6, 1754

BANYAR, Goldsbrow

letter to, from William Johnson, in which Johnson

informs Banyar that the Mohawks of Canajohary

presented him with a gift of a tract of land at a

meeting at Canajohary. Jan. 2, 1761

Re: a hearing in Council about the Canajohary Patent.

Feb. 7, 1763

acquainted William Johnson with the result of a hearing

in Council about the Canajohary Patent. Feb. 18, 1763

examined a true copy of the proceedings of a Council

held in the City of New York; re: Kayaderosseras

Patent. Mar. 15, 1765

BAPTISTE, John (or VAN EPS, John Baptiste)

mention of a report from John Baptiste. Apr. 13, 1698

an interpreter, being dispatched to turn back or go

after messengers being sent by Five Nations to the

French. Feb. 3-6, 1699

sent along with Johannes Glin to watch the activities

of Five Nations at Onnondaga. Feb. 3-6, 1699

sent to watch the movements of Five Nations. Feb. 4,

1699

belts sent with Baptiste to the Mohawks and to Schuyler

and Wessells to attend a general meeting of the Five

Nations. Mar. 21, 1699

mentioned in the Journal of Viele's negotiations at

Onondaga. Apr. 14-May 7, 1699

sent to Albany with a message. Apr. 20-21, 1699

cause for concern because of a delay in Albany. Apr.

21-May 9, 1699

indication that Baptiste was left at Onondaga. May 14,

1699

interpreter with Hille for a speech by DeKanitsore.

June 12-16, 1699

BARBARU, Mr. John (or BARBERU)

present at the councils of the Treaty between the

Governors of New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania and

the Five Nations. Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

BARBERIE, Peter

goods and the boy being held slave to be returned to

Peter Barberie. Dec. 4, 1726

BARBETT

a Mohawk, present at councils in Philadelphia in summer

of 1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

BARBOUR, James

member of War Department Letter to Lewis Pass, Colonel

Thomas L. McKenesey appointing them United States

commissioners to conclude the Eleventh Article of

the Treaty of Prairie Du Chien Aug. 19, 1825. Mar.

27, 1827

BARCLAY, Mr.

rector of Trinity Church, discussion of a title to

lands. July 22, 1754

BARENTS, Roynier

present at councils in Albany. Feb. 25, 1690

BARK

reported being loose. Feb. 25, 1693 (III)

the bark on the trees ready for stripping. Mar. 28,

1694. (IX)

bark of tree replaced for a chain of iron. Aug. 15-20,

1694

problem of the trees growing green again. Nov. 9, 1696

BARK, John. See GUASAWEDAH.

BARLET, Hannis Wolf (or BARELETT, John Wolf)

presented land by Mohawks of Canajohary. May 22, 1769

BARNES, Abraham

representing Maryland at councils in Albany. July 22,

1754

represented Maryland; present at a council in Albany

with Six Nations. Sept. 18 1753-July 5, 1754

BARNES, Benjamin

representing Maryland at the councils in Albany with

Six Nations. Aug. 6, 1754

BARNSLEY, Captain

present at the treaty councils at Fort Pitt with Six

Nations. Aug. 12-15, 1760

BARON, Antoine

interpreter for the Indians of St. Regis and of Lake

of Two Mountains in negotiating for claims to hunting

ground in Vermont. Nov. 3, 1855

BARONET REWMAN (or Rewman)

an Onondaga Indian, present at conference at Easton.

July & Nov. 1756

BARONS, Benjamin

examined a true copy from the records of Indian Affairs.

May 20, 1756

BARRIN, Roland-Michel, Comte de la Galissoniere

complaints to be forwarded to the Governor of Canada.

July 26, 1748 (II)

complaints need to be directed to the Governor of

Canada. Aug. 18, 1748 (IV)

BARTON, Benjamin

witnessed signing of deed from Five Nations to Phelps

and Gorham. July 8, 1788 (I)

BASS, Lewis

United States Commissioner appointed to conclude the

eleven articles of the Treaty of Prairie Du Chien.

Mar. 27, 1827

BATT, Lieutenant Thomas

present at councils at Fort Pitt. June 24, 1768

BAUDE, Comte de Frontenac et Palluau, Louis de

reference to Frontenac's actions returning prisoners.

Nov. 17, 1753

BAUDE DE FRONTENAC ET DE PALLUAU

meetings between Maquas and Governor of Canada. Aug.

10, 1676

discussion of illegal war by the French, when the

Governor tries to break through, the chain will fall

on his left side. Sept. 9, 1687

report of papers past with Governor of France by Five

Nations. Feb. 13, 1688 (II)

Governor of Canada not a good heart. Feb. 16, 1688 (II)

the circle being narrowed on the Governor of Canada.

Sept. 18, 1688

reference to the Governor of Canada having a corrupt

heart. Sept. 18-21, 1688 (II)

letters to Lamberville intercepted. Dec. 27, 1689

sent for Dekanitsore to come to council with him. Jan.

6, 1690

the Governor of Canada to blame. Feb. 25, 1690

indication that the Praying Indians visited the

Governor of Canada. June 4-9, 1691

Frontinack discussed at councils at Albany. Feb. 25,

1693 (III)

letters from the Governor discussed at meetings in

Albany. July 25, 1693

required in propositions to come to Albany, which he

refused to do. Mar. 28, 1694

report of the props of kanetsore to Frontenac in Quebec.

June 25, 1694

messengers sent to Onondaga by Onontio. Jan. 31, 1695

represented at councils at Onondaga. Jan. 31-Feb. 4,

1695

report of a meeting with the Governor of Canada. May

15, 1695 (II)

willing to come as far as Cadarachqui. Aug. 28, 1695

word that he may return to France. June 9, 1697

meeting with Onondio recounted; promise to never make

war on Five Nations again. June 9, 1697 (II)

messages from Onondio discussed. July 8, 1697

belt sent by Onondaga refused because it did not

represent Five Nations. Sept. 14, 1698

belt from the Governor of Canada rejected. June 9,

1797 (III)

BAUDE DE FRONTENAC ET DE PALLUAU, Louis de (or ONONDIA;

ONONDIO; ONONTIO; ONONTO)

See also ONONTIO.

meeting with a delegate from the Five Nations. Sept.

11-12, 1682

deputation of Iroquois to. 1655-[1687]

a belt of peace being sent from the Governor of France

to the Oneidas. July 31, 1693

report of a meeting between an Oneida and six others,

and the Governor of Canada at Mount Reall. Aug.

5-19, 1693

belts sent to the Five Nations via Tarriha discussed in

a message sent by the Onondages to the Governor of

New York. Nov. 22, 1693

report by Joseph, the Mohawk, of a conversation with

Tarriha, the messenger, about his interactions with

Frontenac. Dec. 2, 1693

referred to by the Five Nations as Onnontio; interpretation of three belts to be sent by the Five Nations

to the Governor. Dec. 30, 1693

told by Tarriha that he must go to Albany if he wanted

peace with the Five Nations. Feb. 2-9, 1694

negotiates with Iroquois at Montreal (Sept. 1694).

Letter from, to Minister of Marine. Nov. 5, 1694

message from the Governor of Canada to Five Nations and

their answer. Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 1695

blamed by the Onnondagas for the death of one of their

number at the hands of the French. June 6, 1697

story told of Onondia giving a folded belt to

Odatsigtha asking him to deliver it to the Onnondagas.

June 6, 1697

notification of the Lords of Trade of the death of

Frontenac. Apr. 13, 1698

news of Frontenac's death. Dec. 26, 1698

wampum sent by the Onnondaga and Oneyde to Governor

Collieres upon hearing of the death of Frontenac.

Mar. 21, 1699

belts of Five Nations being sent to console the death

of Frontenac. Apr. 20-21, 1699

Governor General of New France. Concession of land to

the Jesuits of New France of 1680. June 15, 1718

BAVION, Mr.

present at a council in Pittsburg in Sept. 1759. Mar.

12, 1758-Apr. 12-1760

present at councils in Pittsburg. Mar. 15, 1758-Apr.

12, 1760

BAY DES PUONS (or Enitajighe)

indicated as a French center. Dec. 4, 1726

BAYARD, N.

present at councils in Albany. Aug. 30-Sept. 1, 1686

(II)

BAYARD, Colonel Nicholas

representative of New York, present at councils in New

England. Aug. 15-20, 1694

present at councils with Six Nations in Albany in Sept.

Nov. 9, 1696

BAYARD, Nicholas (or BAYNARD, Nicholas)

present at a council in Albany with the Schaghticokes

and Five Nations and present at a representative of

Governor Fletcher. June 15-July 6, 1693

present at councils in Albany. June 24, 1693;

Sept. 29, 1696; Oct. 2, 1696; Oct. 3, 1696

petition to buy lands at Skohare. Sept. 28, 1695

present at a council with Five Nations in Albany.

July 31-Aug. 10, 1696

present at a council in Albany to renew the covenant

chain with Five Nations. Sept. 17-Oct. 9, 1696

employed Schuyler as a land agent in a matter of

purchasing lands from several Mohawks. May 31, 1698

involvement with Dellius discussed. Apr. 13, 1699

present at a council with Dongan and Five Nations.

Aug. 30-Sept. 1, 1699

BAYNARD, Nicholas. See BAYARD, Nicholas.

BAXTER, Gervis

a Captain, who was present when several Mohawk sachems

gave a grant of land to Cornelis van Dyck, Jan Jansen

Bleecker, Pieter Philipsen Schuyler and Johannes

Wendel. July 26, 1683

BAXTER, John

drew up a receipt signed by about fourteen Indians of

Canajohary for payment for lands. Later, witnesses

to the transactions testified that payment was not

made. [1765]

BAYCE, W.H.

surveyor of a tract of land allotted to the Tuscaroras

by an act of the North Carolina legislature in 1748.

June 17, 1803

BAYNTON, John

report of the commissioners at Lancaster. May 3, 1757

present at a council at Lancaster. May 12, 1757

BCHSHIKILL

gave intelligence to Jo Peepy about the Susquehannah

region at the councils at Easton. July 15-26, 1756

BEALL, I.W.

drew up petition signed by New York Indians on Jan. 20,

1831. Presented and written in Washington. Jan. 2,

1831-Mar. 16, 1831

took deposition given by Thomas Dean re: acceptance

of $950 in goods by Menominees from Brotherton for

land on Sept. 18, 1824. (1831?)

wrote letter to Thomas Dean describing his efforts to

prevent Treaty Feb. 8, 1831 from being passed by

Congress. (1832?)

BEAR

bundle of bear skins given. July 7, 1721

a plate, engraved with the figure of a bear, was given

to the Six Nations at council at Boston (presented

in much the same way in which wampum was usually

presented). Aug. 22-Sept. 20, 1723

skins given as wampum would be at councils in Albany.

May 26, 1691.

skins given as wampum would be. Sept. 1722

symbol used by several ambassadors to sign the Treaty

of Quebec 1665. Dec. 13, 1665 (II)

BEAR SKINS

given as wampum would be. June 21, 1693

BEARD, John. See ONONGWALGO.

BEAUCOURS. See DUBOIS BERTHELOT DE BEAUCOURS.

BEAUGRAND, J.S.G.

witness to the treaty with the tribes of Ohio held on

the Miami. Sept. 29, 1817

BEAUHARNOIS,

letter from, to Minister of the Marine. Oct. 7, 1741;

Apr. 20, 1744; Oct. 29, 1744

message that an Indian of Caughnawaga delivered from

the English to the Governor of Canada. July 16, 1744

letter to, from the President of the Navy Board.

Governor General of New France. Apr. 26, 1745

former Governor General of New France. May 15, 1752

BEAVER (or BEAVER KING; TOMAGO)

presented in council at Albany (in much the same way in

which wampum was presented). July 30-Aug. 6, 1684;

Aug. 6, 1687

skins passed like wampum. July 20-Aug. 22, 1677 (II)

skin given as wampum at council in Albany. Aug. 2,

1684 (IV)

skins given as or in manner of wampum. Apr. 16, 1685

presented in council at Albany (in much the same manner

in which wampum was presented). Also restitution was

sought by commissioners from Maryland for deprevations

to value five hundred beavers. The representatives of

the Five Nations gave symbolic beaver and wampum to

signify the promise to compensate the losses with five

hundred beaver the next summer. Aug. 3-13, 1682

restrictions of beaver hunting territories resisted.

Feb. 16, 1688 (II)

skins given as wampum would be. Feb. 25, 1690:

Sept. 29, 1715; Sept., 1722

presented in a council in Albany much as wampum was

presented. May 26, 1691; June 2, 1691

beaver and other furs presented much as wampum. Sept.

2-3, 1691

skins given as presents. Aug. 15-20, 1694

beaver present as wampum. Sept. 17-Oct. 9, 1696

a bundle of beavers given. Oct. 1, 1696

skins used as wampum. Nov. 9, 1696

beavers presented as wampum; "to remove all suspicious

thoughts from your heart". May 16, 1698

beaver skins given as Wampum would. n.d. (June 13-17, 1717)

beaver and deer skins being presented as wampum. Aug.

14-Dec. 1, 1722

Six Nations give beaver skins at the councils in Albany.

Sept. 21, 1722

treaty relative to beaver hunting territories. Sept.

14, 1726

beaver hunting lands and the deed to them discussed.

Dec. 4, 1726

the beaver hunting land agreement mentioned. Dec. 13,

1726

Six Nations present a beaver coat at the councils at

Philadelphia. Oct. 2, 1736

beaver used like wampum. June 22-July 4, 1744

beaver skins spread as wampum. Oct. 3, 1753 (I)

BEAVER, THE (or BEAVER KING)

speech at Loggstown. Aug. 12, 1751

a Delaware chief, brother of Stringas, present at council

at Logstown. May 28-June 13, 1752

accepted Shingas appointment as "king" for the Delawares

by proxy. June I-13, 1752

Delaware, present at councils in Winchester. Nov. 17,

1753

spokesman for councils at Aucquick. Oct. 14, 1754

brother of Chingas; attempting to get aid for the French.

Jan. 29, 1756

Delaware representative to a council in Pittsburgh in

July, 1759. Mar. 15, 1758-Apr. 12, 1760

present at a council in Fort Pitt in April, 1760. Mar.

15, 1758-Apr. 12, 1760

present at a councils in Pittsburgh in the fall of 1759.

Mar. 15, 1758-Apr. 12, 1760

signed a plea for peace and friendship, presented at

Easton. Oct. 13, 1758

Delaware headman, present at councils in Pittsburgh.

Aug. 20, 1759

a Delaware chief who attended the conference at Fort

Pitt. Apr. 6-12, 1760

present at meeting at Fort Pitt. Apr. 6-18, 1760

present at treaty councils at Fort Pitt. Aug. 12-15,

1760

present at the councils at Lancaster. Aug. 11, 1762;

Aug. 12, 1762; Aug. 18, 1762; Aug. 22, 1762

speech to the councils at Lancaster. Aug. 13, 1762

appointed to Cleghiccon to speak for himself at Lancaster.

Aug. 16, 1762 (II)

Delaware, present at the councils at the Forks of the

Muskingham. Dec. 5, 1764

Delaware, present at councils at Fort Pitt. June 24,

1768

BEAVER CREEK

French intentions of building forts that far into the

Ohio country. Nov. 17, 1753

French declare intentions of building a fort on Beaver.

Nov. 14, 1753

BEAVER KING. See THE BEAVER.

BEAVER SKIN BOATS

mentioned at councils at Albany. Oct. 2, 1696

BEAVER SKINS

given to the king for a hat, to restore the popularity

of beaver in European fashion. (July 19, 1701)

BÉCANCOUR

Abenakis and Algonquians of, present at a council at

Caughnawaga. Oct. 5, 1827

BECKER, Jan (or BECKER, John)

Alderman for the city of Albany, present at a council

between Governor Slaughter and a delegation of Mohawk

Praying Indians. May 26, 1691

present at the answer delivered by Governor Slaughter

to the Xian Mohawks. May 26, 1691 (II)

Alderman for the city of Albany, present at a council

with the Five Nations. June 1-4, 1691

BECKMAN, Colonel

Treaty between the Governors of New York, Virginia, and

Pennsylvania and the Five Nations. Aug. 14-Dec. 1,

1722

BECKMAN, John

present at meetings surrounding the larger Albany

Conference. Aug. 6, 1754

BECKWITH,

a Captain, present at an Indian conference at Fort

Johnson. Feb. 2-27, 1756

BEDFORD

suggestion made at Lancaster that Johnson order a store

at Bedford. Aug. 24, 1762

BEECHMAN, William

letter to Stuyvesant renewing peace. Aug. 15, 1663

letter to Stuyvesant about Indian affairs. Sept. 1, 1663

BEECH TREE. See ONEYANHA; ONEYANHE; PETER.

BEECHTREE. See AGHNEYANTHA.

BEECHTREE, Cornelius' son. See KAYEGHTORHA.

BEECKMAN, Colonel

reference in a letter from Ingoldesby to Fletcher about

a Colonel Beeckman raising forces in Ulster county.

Jan. 12, 1694

BEEKER, Jan

present at councils in Albany. May 26, 1691 (III), (IV)

& (V)

BEEKER, John

present at a councils in Albany with the Five Nations.

June 1, 1691

present at councils in Albany. June 1, 1691 (II)

BEEKMAN, John

present at meetings with Indians amidst the councils

at Albany. July 22, 1754

participant in meetings surrounding the larger Albany

Conference. Aug. 6, 1754

claims to hold a Letter Patent to Kayaderosseras,

granted in 1708. Mar. 15, 1765

tried to effect a settlement with the Mohawks over the

bounds of the Kayaderosseras Patent. [June, 1766]

a proprietor of the Kayaderosseras Patent. July 13,

1768

BEGON DE LA PICARDIERE, Michel

signed a copy of articles of peace made between French

and Iroquois to attest to their accuracy, when

compared with the original (1712). Dec. 13, 1665

intendant of New France. His opinion re: concession

of land at Sault St. Louis (Caughnawaga) to the

Jesuits is sought. June 15, 1718

BELCHER, Jonathan

present at councils at Deerfield. Aug. 27-Sept. 1, 1735

Governor of New Jersey; report his declaring war on the

Delawares in a somewhat premature fasion. Aug. 7,

1755-Dec. 3, 1792

BELIEVED WORKS. See TAHUMMINDOYAH.

BELLINGHAM, Richard

Governor of Massachusetts, involved in propositions

presented to Mohawks. Jan. 9, 1669

BELLOMONT, EARL OF

See also COOTE, Richard.

(Governor of New York 1698-1701)

account of expenses at treaty councils. Aug. 6, 1698

(V) & (VI)

THE BELT (or KAGHSWONGHTANYONDE)

Seneca present at councils with Johnson. Sept. 10, 1756

BELT AND EAGLE TAIL

Cherokees passed these at Johnson Hall. Apr. 4, 1768

BELT DYED A BLOODLY COLOR

Lewis Montour arrived with such a belt at councils at

Old Town. Nov. 15, 1753

indication that the belt was sealed in blood. Nov. 15,

1753

BELT-FIVE BLACK SOUARES ON A WHITE GROUND

one of three peace belts sent to Frontenac; the five

squares are explained as representing the Five Nations.

Dec. 30, 1693

BELT FROM SIX NATIONS TO DELAWARES

"Teedyuscung then explained the Belt, saying, it was

sent him by the Six Nations, and he accepted of it:

You see, says he, square in the Middle, meaning the

Lands of the Indians, and at the End the Figure of a

Man, indicating the English; and at the other End

another meaning the French; our Uncles told Us, that

both these coveted our Lands; but let us join together

to defend our Lands against both, you shall be

Partakers with us of our Lands." July & Nov., 1756

BELT GIVEN AT CONESTOGA

Six Nations gave a belt with a turtle on it to take the

rum away. July 7, 1721

BELT GIVEN AT PHILADELPHIA

belt given to affirm the treaty of 1732; Belt of white

wampum, eleven rows, four black St. George's crosses

on it. Oct. 2, 1736

BELT GIVEN BY THE FRENCH

white belt of thirteen rows deep with four towns and

forts worked in it with Black Wampum. Nov. 17, 1753

BELT GIVEN THE WAPINGS BY NEW YORK

Short White Belt, with the date 1745 separated in the

middle by two heart shapes, also a circle pendent

representing the sun; certificates from Clinton and

Hendy in favor of the Wapingers. Oct. 25, 1758

BELT-LARGE BELT ALMOST ALL BLACK

second belt of three peace belts brought to Frontenac;

it was said to represent the wish that the Governor

upset his war kettle and the belt was for the purpose

of throwing it down. Dec. 30, 1693

BELT-LARGEST EVER GIVEN

at a conference at Fort Johnson, Peter Wraxall, noted

largest belt ever given was intended to signify that

Six Nations now saw objects in their proper light.

Feb. 2-27, 1756

BELT-LARGEST OF THREE

accompanied a belt of five black squares on a white

ground, and another belt almost all black.

although of little description was the third of three

peace belts brought to Frontenac; its message was the

desire of peace between the Kings of France and

England. Dec. 30, 1693

BELT [OF WAMPUM], The (or KAGHSWOOGHTANSYONDE; OLD BELT;

TOHASWICHDONIUNTY)

Croghan told to keep the council of the Belt of Wampum.

Apr. 23, 1755 (II)

present at conferences in Philadelphia in the spring

of 1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

present for conversations at the house of Israel

Pemberton in the spring of 1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3,

1792

refused to leave Aucquick when the village was evacuated.

Jan. 29, 1756

attended the councils at Carlisle. Jan. 29, 1756

discussion of sending messengers to the Delaware; at a

council in Philadelphia. Feb. 24, 1756

present at a council in Philadelphia. Mar. 27, 1756

"a Seneca Sachem" present at a meeting at Fort Johnson.

Sept. 15-20, 1757

served as speaker for the Seneca at a meeting at Fort

Johnson. July 28, 1758

a Seneca Indian who served as speaker for the Senecas

at a meeting of the Senecas with William Johnson at

Niagara. Aug. 11, 1761

BELT OF WAMPUM WITH STICKS

belt of wampum with twenty eight sticks interwoven to

represent twenty eight prisoners held by the French.

Sept. 18-21, 1688

this particular belt was given by an Iroquois delegation

to a council with Governor Andros in Albany signifying

the twenty eight prisoners the Sachems claimed were

seized by the French and taken to France prior to

hostilities between the French and English. Sept.

18-21, 1688

BELT RENEWING EASTON/PASSED IN PHILADELPHIA THE SPRING

OF 1758

Teddyuscung "gave a belt of ten rows which had in the

center of it two men. The figures of the men taking

one another by the hand which Teedyuscung said

represented himself and the Government. At each end

of the belt were two figures representing the sun

rising and sunset and between those figures were eight

figures in white wampum representing the nations who

had taken hold of it." Mar. 12, 1758-Apr. 12, 1760

BELT 20 DEEP

belt passed by Onondagas to the agent for the colony

of Virginia at a meeting in Albany. Nov. 1, 1679

BELT WITH EMBLEM OF SIX NATIONS

at an Indian conference at Fort Johnson, one belt was

given to the Six Nations by William Johnson in

condolence. This was a belt "with an emblem of the

six nations joined hand in hand with us". Feb.

2-27, 1756

BELT WITH HATCHET

description of a French belt in the form of a hatchet

refused by Six Nations, reported in a message

received by Weiser. June 18, 1748 (I)

large belt with a figure of a hatchet on it, passed at

councils in Albany. Oct. 5-14, 1745

belt with the figure of a hatchet on it. Oct. 31, 1745

large belt with a hatchet on it, given at councils at

Albany. Nov. 30, 1745

BELT WITH HEART IN MIDDLE

presented to Six Nations by Guy Johnson at a council at

which he roasted the head of an ox and threw it into

a fire to indicate how "the Rebels" would be punished.

The belt was to represent the Indians and the British.

May 25, 1812

BELT WITH STICKS

the belt passed to Andros with twenty eight sticks

representing the twenty eight prisoners taken by the

French in a time of peace. Sept. 18-21, 1688 (IV)

BELT WITH 28 STICKS

the belt given at councils at Albany to secure the

release of twenty eight prisoners taken to France.

Sept. 18-21, 1688 (III)

BELT WITH TWO FIGURES

belt described at Easton, having two human figures

holding hands, standing for the Indians at one end,

the British the other. (names of the Indian tribes

representative in the belt) (streaks of black wampum

on it representing the road from Ohio to Philadelphia).

Oct. 20, 1758

BELTS. See BLACK BELT; BURLINGTON INVITATION BELT;

CARLISLE BELT; CONESTOGA BELT; COVENANT CHAIN BELT;

EASTON PEACE BLET; FORT DETROIT PEACE BELT; FORT NIAGARA

PEACE BELT; FORT PITT BELTS; FRENCH BELT; GREEN PAINTED

BELT; LANCASTER BELT; ROAD BELT; TEEDYUSCUNG'S PEACE

BELT; WHITE BELT; WYANDOT-SIX NATION-NEW YORK ALLIANCE

BELT.

BELTS--PENNSYLVANIA PURCHASE OF THE SUSQUAHANNAH

one belt of six rows symbolizing that it is wrong to

stray off of land negociated and promised by and

between forefathers; one belt of eight rows symbolizing

the need to retain Shamokin and Wyomink there to

always have a great council fire. Aug. 6, 1754

BELTS WITH RED STONES

two belts with red stones received by the Five Nations

from the Dionondades (Wyandots) to be answered a year

later with two belts being sent by the Five Nations,

all of this enabling prisoner exchange. Jan. 31-Feb.

4, 1695

BEN

interpreter for the Delawares, present at conferences

at Easton. July-Nov. 1756

BENCH

wiping the bood off the bench. Sept. 20, 1723

BENEZETTE, Anthony

present at conversations at the home at Israel Pemberton

in the spring of 1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

BENJAMIN

present at the councils at Easton. July 15-26, 1758;

July 28, 1756

present at the first councils at Easton. Aug. 7, 1755-

Dec. 3, 1792; July 31, 1756

Teedyuscung's interpreter discussed by Pumshire. July

24, 1756

present at a council at Easton. July 29, 1756; July

30, 1756

BENNET, George. See HOWAHDOGOHDEH.

BENNET, Jacob. See HOMAGAWAS.

BENNET, John. See ONDIHEHOH.

BENNET, George

signer to an indenture selling lands on Cattaraugus

reservation and tracts on Allegany and Tondawanda;

attached to the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BENNETT, Jacob

signer of an indenture selling lands on Cattaraugus

reservation and tracts on Allegany and Tondawanda;

attached to the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BENNETT, John

signer of an indenture selling lands on the Cattaraugus

reservation and tracts on Allegany and Tondawanda;

attached to the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

signature submitting to changes in the Treaty of Buffalo

Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BENNOXCUMWA

Shawnee, present at councils at Fort Pitt. June 24, 1768

BENSON, Egbert

present at Treaty of Oneidas with New York State. Sept.

22, 1788

negotiated treaty with Oneidas in 1788. Jan. 15, 1793

present Feb. 25, 1789 at councils with the Cayugas in

Albany. Apr. 19, 1793

signed a deed dated Sept. 12, 1788 at Fort Schuyler.

Apr. 19, 1793

signed a deed dated Sept. 22, 1788 at Fort Schuyler.

Apr. 19, 1793

agent for the State of New York at a treaty between the

Seven Nations of Canada and the State of New York

(with the aid of the Commissioner of the United States).

May 31, 1796

present at the treaty with the Seven Nations of Canada

in New York. May 31, 1796

agent for New York at the Treaty with the Mohawk at

Albany for the relinquishment of their claims to all

lands. Mar. 29, 1797

agent for the State of New York, appointed to hold a

treaty with the Mohawks. Mar. 29, 1797

BENSWASINA

Shawnee, present at the councils at the Forks of the

Muskingham. Dec. 5, 1764

BENTON, Dr. W.

represented New York in sale of land from Five Nations

at Buffalo Creek June, 1788. June 2, 1789

BENZIER, Christian Thomas

messenger sent to calm the fears of Bethlehem. July 10,

1756

BERNARD, Francis

Governor of New Jersey, wampum reportedly given by him

to the Minisinks. Aug. 4, 1758

present at councils at Burlington. Aug. 7, 1758

present at councils at Easton. Oct. 11, 1758; Oct. 12,

1758; Oct. 13, 1758; Oct. 15, 1758; Oct. 19, 1758;

Oct. 26, 1758

speech at councils at Burlington. Aug. 8, 1758

speech to councils at Easton. Oct. 16, 1758

speech to discuss claims of Wapings and Miniskins, with

Six Nations present as mediators. Oct. 21, 1758

speech about having settled all claims of the Minisinks.

Oct. 25, 1758

Governor present when Indians from Anawaga promise to

aid England in forthcoming military campaign. Apr.

10, 1759

reference to the role played at Easton in 1758. Aug.

19, 1762

BERRY, Jack

Major Jack Berry; signature submitting to changes in

the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

signed cession of land from Senecas to Tuscaroras.

Mar. 30, 1808

BERRY, Major

James M. Strong requests that Major Berry and "the

Chiefs" be informed of complaints about persons

cutting timber on Seneca reservation. Oct. 26, 1816

BERRY, Thomas

Commissioner of Massachusetts present at councils in

Albany. June 20, 1744

BERTIE COUNTY

section of North Carolina, where Tuscaroras reserved

land. [1748]

plan of land in Bertie County, reserved to the

Tuscaroras. June 17, 1803

letter concerning lands formerly held by the Tuscarora

Indians in Bertie County, North Carolina. Apr. 5,

1911

lands in, secured by the Tuscarora Indians via an act

of the legislature of North Carolina. May 2, 1778

BERTRAM, Joseph

present at the Treaty of Greenville. July 22, 1814

BETHLEHAM

an evacuation center for people from the Wyoming and

Susquehannah country. July 10, 1756

BETRAYAL

warnings about betrayal. Feb. 25, 1693 (II)

Oneidas in sending messengers to Canada said to be

entering on a breach of promises. June 9, 1697 (II)

BETSCHIHITLEWY

a Delaware informant to Jo Peepy of Teedyuscung's

presence at Fort Niagara visiting the French. Aug.

7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

BEVERLEY, Thomas

present at councils in Albany. Sept. 29, 1715

BEVERLY, Peter

present at a meeting in Williamsburg in Nov., 1722

where the issue of passports was discussed. Aug. 14-

Dec. 1, 1722

BEVERLY, W.

present at councils at Lancaster. June 30, 1744

BEVERLY, William

present at Treaty at Lancaster. June 22-July 4, 1744;

July 2, 1744 (II)

present at Treaty at Lancaster. Member of Virginia

House of Burgesses and Colonel and County Lieutenant

of Orange County. July 2, 1744

one of the Virginia representatives to the councils at

Lancaster. July 24, 1744

deed of the Treaty at Lancaster read at the councils

in Loggstown. June 1-13, 1752

BICKLEY, May

claims to hold a Letter Patent to Kayaderosseras,

granted in 1708. Mar. 15, 1765

BICKRAN,

negotiator with Indians at Treaty at Newtown. Aug. 20,

1795

BIDDER, John

witness to the treaty of Spring Wells. Sept. 8, 1815

BIDDLE, Lieutenant

present at a council in Pittsburgh in July, 1759. Mar.

15, 1758-Apr. 12, 1760

present at councils in Pittsburgh. Aug. 20, 1759

BIDDLE, Major

agent at Green Bay mentioned in the correspondence

surrounding the Treaty with the Menominee. Feb. 8,

1831

BIG ARM. See CAKANONEKOANOS.

BIG ASH

signed the Treaty with the Senecas and Shawnees on the

Cowskin River. Dec. 29, 1832

BIG BALE OF A KETTLE. See SESSEWA.

BIG BEAR, Cornelius. See AGHNYONKEA.

BIG BEAR FAT

Six Nations chief reported in a council with French

reported in discussions in Philadelphia. May 8, 1758

BIG BELT

a Seneca named in the land grant division of thirty

thousand acres on the Sandusky River. Sept. 29, 1817

BIGBIE, Nathanial

present at councils at Lancaster. June 30, 1744

BIGBIE, Nathaniel, Jr.

present at councils at Lancaster. June 30, 1744

BIG BONE

Seneca signer to the Treaty at Camp Holmes. Aug. 24,

1835

BIG CHRISTIAN. See KAGHNENTA.

BIG CROSS. See GYASOTA.

BIG DEER, George. See GUAWANOOH.

BIG HANYOST. See THAGHNAGHGWANEKEAS.

BIG HOMINE

flag given to Big Homine returned. Nov. 17, 1753

BIG HOMMONY

wrote a letter to the Pennsylvania Provisional Council

from the Ohio country. June 23, 1748

present for part of the councils at Loggstown.

Aug. 11-Sept. 29, 1748; Oct. 15, 1748

BIG ISAAC

Seneca signer to the Treaty at Camp Holmes. Aug. 24,

1835

BIG LANCE

belt given said to be belt of Big Lance. Feb. 25, 1690

BIG KETTLE (or SEDAJESHANNE)

Wyandot, present at councils in Winchester. Nov. 17,

1753

speaker for Wyandots, who delivered a speech to the Six

Nations, Delawares, and English in answer to a speech

sent by Six Nations to the Wyandots. [1754]

BIG KNIFE, Anthony

member of the First Christian Party; signer to the

Oneida submission to changes in the Treaty of Buffalo

Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BIG MOUNTAIN

the symbol of the Onondaga as the center in the Covenant

Chain myth. Nov. 17, 1753

BIG SPOON. See ADOGODQUO.

BIG TREE

See also KIANDOGEWUA; TAWANAH.

signed a letter from the Senecas to the "Grand Council

of the Thirteen Fires" (United States). Dec. 31, 1790

desired that the speech of the Oneida chief, Big Skies,

be taken down in writing by Oliver Phelps and

Rosecrantz. Aug. 20, 1795

persuaded the Senecas to sell most of their country.

Dec. 19, 1811 (II)

BIG TREE, CHIEF

killed by Americans although he went in peace. June

18, 1794

BIG TREE, TREATY AT

Senecas reserved land at. This land was later ceded by

Senecas to Tuscaroras. Mar. 30, 1808

BIG TURTLE. See CUNTAHTINTAHWAY.

BIG WAVE, CHIEF

Menominee Indian Chief. States the Menominee were

assisted by the Wapanokas to drive out the Fox Indians.

Clan to own part of the country with the Wapanokas.

Aug. 26-Sept. 13, 1824

BINFORD, John M.

letter from, to James Turner, Governor of North Carolina.

Re: Binford acdepts commission to carry into effect

the law for the relief of the Tuscarora Indians.

Jan. 23, 1803

BIRCH, G., Major

witness to the Treaty at Camp Holmes. Aug. 24, 1835

BIRDS

whistling of birds. Bad rumors should be regarded with

no more seriousness than the whistling of birds.

July-Nov. 1756

bodies exposed to the birds, against nature, must be

covered up. July 27, 1757 (II)

BIZALLIOU, Peter

sent for to be interpreter for councils at Conestoga.

Mar. 21, 1722

interpreter for a council in Philadelphia with Six

Nations and Delaware. Aug. 20, 1736

BLACK. See Seeistane.

BLACK BELT

a black belt of fourteen rows was chosen by Scaroyady

as the belt to be given to the Six Nations at Onondaga

from Pennsylvania and Maryland to enforce Virginia's

invitation to the Six Nations to meet the Governor of

Virginia at Winchester in the spring of 1755. Jan.

23, 1755 (II)

BLACK NICHOLL

point from which land on the Grand River was to be

surrendered at council at Ancaster. Mar. 26-28, 1819

William Claus asserts that land above Black Nicholl was

purchased by the Crown from the Missasagas. July 4,

1819

BLACK, William

secretary for part of the councils at Lancaster. June

25-July 3, 1744

present at Treaty at Lancaster. July 2, 1744

attested to accuracy of copy of deed from Treaty at

Lancaster (1774). July 2, 1744 (II)

BLACKBICK. See SAGAYENQUARAGHTA.

BLACKISTONE, Nathaniel (or BLAKISTON)

Governor of Maryland, communications with Coote

mentioned. Apr. 13, 1699

BLACKS

a restrictive clause was added to a deed for a tract of

land from the Oneidas to the New England Indians

(Brotherton): "the same shall not be Possessed by any

Persons Deemed of the said Tribes Who are Descended

from or have Intermixed with Negroes and Mulattoes."

Oct. 4, 1774

Five Nations agree to return runaway slaves to Virginia,

if any are found in their country. Treaty at Albany.

Aug. 29-Sept. 12, 1722

BLACKSMITH. See ALAWISTONIS.

BLAIR, James

listed as being present at a meeting in Williamburg in

Nov., 1722 where the issue of passports was discussed.

Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

BLAKISTON, Governor. See BLACKISTONE, Nathaniel.

BLAND, Henry

witness to the treaty with the tribes of Ohio held on

the Miami. Sept. 29, 1817

BLANDT (or BLANTD)

identified as a Mohawk sachem, signer of the deed for

the Susquehannah country at the Albany Conference.

Aug. 6, 1754

Blantd, signer of the ratification of the 1736 deed to

the Susquehannah country at the Albany Conference.

Aug. 6, 1754

signer of a 1736 deed; enclosed in the proceedings of

the councils at Easton. July 21-Aug. 7, 1757

BLANKETS

substituted for wampum at a council at Boston. Aug. 22-

Sept. 20, 1723

two blankets given to wipe away and dry up the blood

that has been spilt. Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

BLAST, THE. See SAWEDOWA.

BLEECHER, John

present at councils in Albany with Six Nations. Sept.

21, 1722

BLEECHER, Joseph

Commissioner of Indian Affairs, present at Treaty at

Albany. Aug. 29-Sept. 12, 1722

BLEECHER, Jan Jansen (or BLEEKER, Jan Janser; BLEEKER,

John Janse)

See also BLEEKER, Jan; BLEEKER, Johannes.

received a grant of land from Mohawk sachems. July 26,

1683

Alderman of the city of Albany, present at a council

between Governor Slaughter and a delegation of Mohawk

Praying Indians. May 26, 1691

Alderman for the city of Albany, present at a council

with the Five Nations. June 1, 1691

Five Nations representatives asked that Bleeker be

included on the "Bench" indicating that he was a

Mohawk. June 2, 1691

present at a council with Senecas and Mohawks held in

Albany. Sept. 2-4, 1691

present at a council with Five Nations representatives.

June 6, 1692

present for part of a council in Albany. Feb. 2-9, 1694

recorder for a council for four of the Five Nations held

in Albany. Oct. 8, 1698

message from the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. Dec.

26, 1698

BLEECKER, John. See BLEEKER, John.

BLEECKER, John J.

granted a land grant in the deed dated Sept. 22, 1788 at

Fort Schuyler. Apr. 19, 1793

interpreter for councils at Fort Schuyler in Sept. of

1788. Apr. 19, 1793

witness for councils Feb. 25, 1789 in Albany. Apr. 19,

1793

BLEEKER, Captain

present at councils in Albany. May 3, 1690

BLEEKER, Jan

See also BLEECKER, Jan Jansen.

present at councils at Albany; said to be Mohawk and

asked to represent them in council. June 1, 1691 (II)

present at councils at Albany. May 26, 1691 (III) & (V)

BLEEKER, Jan Janis (or BLYCKER, Jan Jansz)

present at councils in Albany. Aug. 28, 1689; Feb. 25,

1690; July 6, 1695, Aug. 28, 1695 (I) & (II); Sept. 4,

1695; Sept. 18-19, 1695; Oct. 19, 1695; Sept. 14, 1698;

Oct. 21, 1698; (July 19, 1701)

signed message sent to Onondaga. Jan. 6, 1690

present at meetings in Albany. Jan. 20, 1690

present at councils with Five Nations in Albany. Mar.

28, 1694 (IX)

BLEEKER, Jan Jansen

recorder for a council where propositions were presented

by the sachems of Onondaga and Oneida. Feb. 3-6, 1699

attended a council at Onondaga. Apr. 14-May 7, 1699

report of Schuyler and Bleeker's conference at Onondaga.

Apr. 21-May 9, 1699

Messrs. Schuyler and Bleeker to the Earle of Bellomont.

May 14, 1699

proceedings of the Commissioners and the Five Nations.

June 12-16, 1699

BLEEKER, Jocobus

interpreter at councils in Albany. Oct. 5-14, 1745

BLEEKER, Johanne

present at councils in Albany. Sept. 14, 1698

BLEEKER, Johannes

See also BLEECKER, Jan Jansen.

present at councils in Albany. June 6, 1692; Oct. 16,

1721

BLEEKER, Johannis

interpreter for councils in Albany. May 16, 1698 (II)

BLEEKER, John (or BLEECKER, John)

present at councils in Albany. Oct. 17, 1700; Sept. 1722

interpreter for a council in Albany to consider

propositions of four of the Five Nations. May 16, 1698

BLEEKER, Nicholas

journal of Johannes Glen and Nicholas Bleeker's

negociations at Onnondaga. Apr. 20-21, 1699

BLEEKER, Rutger

present at councils in Albany. Dec. 4, 1726

BLEIKER,

interpreter at interrogation of Thomas King at Sandusky.

Re: King's meeting with Pondiac. [Oct. 3, 1764]

BLEW STOCKING. See BLUE STOCKING.

BLISS, Captain J.

witness to the agreement between the Menominee and the

Indians of New York purchasing lands Sept. 23, 1822;

documents enclosed in the Treaty with the Menominee.

Feb. 8, 1831

BLOCK, Jury

promise no harm would come to him. June 12-16, 1753

BLOOD

sand over blood imagery employed. June 3, 1756

clean up spilt blood. Apr. 16, 1685

Canada breaking covenant by shedding so much blood.

Feb. 13, 1688 (II)

wipe off the blood. Feb. 25, 1690

reference to it being spilt. Sept. 1691

said to be of one blood. May 26, 1692

being of one blood. June 6, 1692 (II)

reference to being of one head, one blood, one soul.

Feb. 25, 1693 (III)

condolence for blood shed by French. May 31, 1693

condole blood spilt at Cadarachqui. June 25, 1694

wiped away. Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 1695 (II)

blood spilt. Oct. 19, 1695

to be of one body, one head, and one blood. May 16,

1698 (II)

purify from stains of blood. Sept. 14, 1698

bemoan the blood you lost. (July 19, 1701)

must be avenged. Sept. 29, 1715

been of one blood. n.d.(June 13-17, 1717)

wipe away the blood. Sept., 1722

wiping away the blood of the murder of Ghesanont,

covering it. Sept. 21, 1722

wallowing in their blood. Sept. 20, 1723

one body, one blood, one heart. July 4, 1727

washed away. Dec. 15, 1733; Nov. 2, 1753

if not wiped away will dissolve the union. Aug. 24, 1742

wipe the stains from the covenant chain. Oct. 5-14, 1745

wiping all stains off the covenant chain. Nov. 30, 1745

being of one head, heart, and blood. Apr. 24, 1748

said to be still smoking; attempt to be as one blood.

Nov. 17, 1753

becoming one blood. July 21, 1755

need to clear away the pollution of blood. Sept. 10,

1756

wiping away the blood. May 10, 1757

reference to blood being on the door. July 21, 1757

Wampum passed by Teedyuscung at Easton to clear the

blood away. July 26, 1757

cover the grass touched by spilt blood. July 27,

1757 (II)

wiping the blood away, councils at Easton. Oct. 8, 1758

blood cleaned away. Oct. 12, 1758

blood to be buried deep in the earth. Oct. 13, 1758

removing the blood. Oct. 25, 1758

blood cleaned from the council seats. Oct. 26, 1758

blood wiped away at councils in Pittsburgh. Aug. 20,

1759

blood washed away in condolence for C. Weiser; blood

that has been spilled on road will not be taken notice

of by Indians, as join in agreement with English. Aug.

15, 1761

wiped away at Lancaster. Aug. 12, 1762

wiping away the blood of the Middle Creek Massacre.

Apr. 4, 1768

cleaned away at Johnson Hall. June 24, 1768

scrape away the blood. Sept. 29, 1769

BLOODGOOD, Abraham

witness to a deed signed Sept. 12, 1788 at Fort Schuyler.

Apr. 19, 1793

BLOUNT, James

a Tuscarora Chief to whom land reserved by the Tuscaroras

is confirmed for the Tuscaroras by an act of the North

Carolina legislature. [1748]

BLOUNT, Tom (or BLUNT)

Tuscarora chief who signed preliminary articles of peace

with North Carolina. Nov. 25, 1712

Tuscarora chief who negotiated with the government of

North Carolina for an exchange of land. June 5, 1717

BLUE EYES

signer to an indenture selling lands on the Cattaraugus

reservation and tracts on Allegany and Tondawanda;

attached to the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

signature submitting to changes in the Treaty of Buffalo

Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BLUE HILLS

discussion in the Albany Conference to the people

settling beyond the Blue Hills over the Susquahannah

contrary to stipulations with Indians. Aug. 6, 1754

BLUE LEGS. See HAUNEHHAYOH.

BLUE SKIES

an Onondaga chief who delivered a speech to settle a

disturbance caused by some murders. Aug. 20, 1795

BLUE SKY

See also TOWYOCAUNA.

signed cession of land from Senecas to Tuscaroras. Mar.

30, 1808

BLUE STOCKING (or BLEW STOCKING)

Captain Blew Stocking meeting with officials in Albany.

Jan. 20, 1690

BLUEBECK

chief sachem of the Sennekes; report of having a

conference with the Governor of Canada. Aug. 14-Dec.

1, 1722

BLUM, Stephen

escort for Six Nations deputies on a trip to Fort Allen.

May 5, 1756

BLUNT, Tom. See BLOUNT, Tom.

BLYCKER, Jan Jansz. See BLEEKER, Jan Janis.

BLYKER, Jan Janta

present at councils at Albany. Sept. 4, 1691

BLYTH, William (or BLYTHE, William)

See also SAGREA.

witness for the Treaty of Loggstown. June 1-13, 1752

home to be an Indian Shelter, and to be known by the

name Sagrea. Jan. 29, 1756

BLYTHE, William. See BLYTH, William.

BOARD OF TRADE

letter from W. Dinwiddie, enclosing proceedings. Nov.

17, 1753

cover letter from Johnson to the Board of Trade. July

31, 1755

BOCCALOONS (or BOUCALAONCE; BOWDANCE)

Andrew Montour tells Governor (state unknown) that the

Baccaloons of Caw'awnago await General to make

alliance with the English instead of the French.

Feb. 20, 1759

Bowdance Indians from Conewango present at councils in

Philadelphia. Feb. 13, 1759

BOCHART de Champigny, Jean, Sieur de Noroy et de Verneuil

intendant of New France 1686-1702. Letter from, to

Minister of Marine. Nov. 5, 1694

BODIN

attested the copy of the manuscript. Dec. 4, 1726

BODIN, G.

attested copy. Dec. 13, 1726

BODY

imagery of the body of the Onondagas being separated and

scattered in several places. July 18, 1826

said to be of one body. May 26, 1692

Onnondagas use the imagery of arms being tied together

to describe the effect of being tied too closely to

the French "I will not have my arm tied to yours,

because you might lift up your arm against my own

people and then my arm would hang to yours". June 9,

1697 (III)

body imagery used to talk about the Covenant Chain;

"because we are still one body, one head, one blood,

we know well enough that the Governor of Canada has

used all his endeavours to separate us from one

another." May 16, 1698

to be of one body, one head, one blood. May 16, 1698 (II)

being of one body. Oct. 21, 1698

fight in one body. Sept. 29, 1715

Governor of Pennsylvania referred to the people of

Pennsylvania and the Five Nations being united in "one

head, one body, and one heart by the strongest ties

of love and friendship." Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

one body, one blood, one heart. July 4, 1727

to be of one body; speech to be given to Six Nations.

Oct. 13, 1736

reply to speeches given in Philadelphia. Oct. 14, 1736

reference to the covenant chain uniting the Five Nations

and the English in one body and one soul. June 22-

July 4, 1744

become one body. July 24, 1744; July 21, 1755

being of one body and one flesh. Oct. 5-14, 1745;

Nov. 30, 1745

to be of one body and one flesh. Oct. 31, 1745

gather everyone together to create one body. Nov. 17,

1753

Morris uses the imagery of a body to symbolize alliance.

Apr. 23, 1755 (II)

bodies exposed to the birds, against nature, must be

covered up. July 27, 1757 (II)

to be as one man, but of one heart and head. July 25,

1757 (II)

BOGARDUS, Dr.

present at councils with Five Nations in Albany. Mar.

28, 1694 (IX)

BOISCHE, Charles de la, Marquis de Beauharnois

Onondagas said to have gone to renew the covenant with

the Governor of Canada. Aug. 9, 1745

meeting with the Governor of Canada and the Onondaga

discussed. Oct. 5-14, 1745; Nov. 30, 1745

said to have prevailed on the Six Nations to take up the

hatchet against the English. Oct. 31, 1745

BOLTON,

Lieutenant Colonel, present at council held at Niagara

with Six Nations and allies. n.d. (July, 1777)

BOMDI, Antoine

interpreter for the Treaty of Greenville. July 22, 1814

BOND, James

left money in payment to Senecas for land ceded in the

keeping of Erastus Granger, United States Indian agent.

May 25, 1812

BONDIE, Antoine

witness to the treaty at Spring Wells. Sept. 8, 1815

BONES

bones buried and forgotten. June 24, 1768

imagery of the bones of the dead being dropped into a

hole where a pine tree was lifted; the bones fall into

the river under the tree and are swept away and

forgotten, the tree secured so that no one knows it

had been uprooted. Aug. 19, 1762

collected and buried at Lancaster. Aug. 26, 1762

burying the bones of "this unhappy war". Dec. 5, 1764

bones of the murdered buried beneath the Tree of Peace.

Apr. 4, 1768

BORARDUS, Peter

present for part of a council with Five Nations sachems

in Albany. Feb. 2-9, 1694

BOSTON

See also MASSACHUSETTS.

covenant with Boston discussed. June 1, 1691 (II)

report of French designs on Boston. Dec. 2, 1693

council of government of Massachusetts with Six Nations,

Soatacook, and Mohegan Indians at Boston. Said to be

a proper meeting place, although Albany is recognized

as the location of the Great Tree, the council fire

where the Six Nations, shall meet the English in

general. Aug. 22-Sept. 20, 1723

name "Broadway" given to the government of Boston.

Sept. 20, 1723

Massachusetts working to get Boston established as a

place to counsel with Eastern Indians. Sept. 28, 1724

indications that some future councils may be held in

Boston. Oct. 31, 1745

Boston advises Seneca to remain neutral in war. May 16,

1777

BOSTON, COUNCILS IN

propositions to the Mohawks in Boston. Jan. 9, 1669

proceedings of councils in Boston with Six Nations.

Sept. 20, 1723

mentioned at councils in Albany. Oct. 5-14, 1745

certificate with Six Nations discussed at councils in

Albany. Nov. 30, 1745

BOSTONIANS

Americans, referred to as "Bostonians" by Six Nations

at a council at Niagara. Feb. 17-19, 1780

Americans, referred to as "Bostonians" by Frederick

Haldimano in a speech to the Oneidas. [1780]

wish to be united with the Indians, according to a

speech made to the Six Nations at the Treaty at Fort

Stanwix. Nov. 6, 1784

the Mohawks of Grand River are hearing reports that the

Bostonians plan to attack the Shawnees. Aug. 7, 1785

BOUCLONES

town on the Ohio sending representatives to councils in

Philadelphia. Feb. 13, 1759

BOUCALAONOE. See CONEWANGO.

BOUNDARIES

discussion of boundaries between Five Nations and

Virginia Indians. Oct. 16, 1721

problems of Indians hunting east of the Great Mountains.

July 6, 1721

desire by Six Nations to confirm the Treaty of Logstown

and enforce the treaty on Virginians as well;

impossible for the Six Nations to move any further

west. June 22-July 4, 1744

the meaning of the mountains. June 25-July 3, 1744

Six Nations assert that boundaries be observed; and

outline them again at Lancaster. July 24, 1744

disagreement about specific land boundaries and the

problems that the treaty of Lancaster did not solve

discussed at the councils at Loggstown. June 1-13,

1752

problems of boundaries being only acceptable if described

on paper. June 12-16, 1753

discussion of boundaries with Virginia and Six Nations.

Nov. 17, 1753

boundaries of lands in the Wyoming Valley discussed at

Easton. July 28, 1757

to be finally reviewed by the council at Onondaga. Aug.

28, 1762

of Five Nations confederacy, described. Nov. 18, 1763

European american settlement beyond boundaries discussed.

Apr. 4, 1768

grant by Six Nations to the English and agreement for a

boundary line; proposed to settle difficulties

between settlers and Indians. Nov. 5, 1768

talk of why boundaries were drawn originally at 1768

Fort Stanwix. July 3, 1783

Six Nations worried about due to future peace between

Britain and American Indians worry about boundaries,

mention of white encroachment on Ohio River. Oct. 14,

1783

specific description of boundary lines to separate

settlers from Six Nations. Oct. 22, 1784

boundary description recounted (Fort Stanwix 1748);

treaty reaffirming friendship and the boundaries

relinquishing Indian claims. Jan. 9, 1789

boundary description for Treaty of Albany Feb. 25, 1789

recounted in exemplification of deeds. Apr. 19, 1793

boundary description for Treaty of Fort Herkimer

recounted in exemplification of deeds. Apr. 19, 1793

boundary description for Treaty of Fort Schuyler

recounted in exemplification of deeds. Apr. 19, 1793

indication of boundaries in the Indenture with the

Senecas at Buffalo Creek referring to the Wadsworth

Treaty council with the Senecas on the Genesee Sept.

15, 1797. June 30, 1802

description of boundaries of land grants given to the

Indians of Ohio under treaty held on the Miami on the

foot of Lake Erie. Sept. 29, 1817

boundaries described for lands in Indian Territory in

the Treaty at Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BOUNDARY

boundary lines discussed Lancaster. Aug. 26, 1762

the issue of drawing boundary lines discussed at Easton

Aug. 15, 1761

BOUDE,

at Lancaster, Boude met the Indians attending a

conference at Harris Ferry, Lancaster. Mar. 29-May

21, 1757

BOUFAIT, Louis

witness to the Treaty at Spring Wells. Sept. 8, 1815

BOUNTY

scalps being exchanged for powder and lead. Oct. 31,

1745

we are all of one...scalp which never is to be separate.

June 1, 1691 (II)

a bounty of fifty shillings for every head of an enemy

to be found within the three mile radius of

Schennectady. June 15-July 6, 1693

mention of the fetching of scalps from New England.

Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 1695 (II)

message that Frontenac sent the Onogungos to New England

to fetch scalps instead of beaver according to a

Praying Indian, Adiejagthaa. Jan. 31-Feb. 4, 1695

bounty for scalps set at councils in Albany. May 23-

June 4, 1723

scalps as monuments to Cruelty not bravery. Aug. 16-19,

1740

scalps to be sent to the site of the War Kettle. July

17, 1747

indication of French Indians killing twenty one English

fishermen and carrying their scalps to Cape Breton

for reward. Aug. 6, 1754

report of British scalps being brought in by the

Delawares. Feb. 26, 1756

Pennsylvania scalp bounties set. Apr. 8, 1756

bounty resolution. Apr. 10, 1756

discussion of money for bounties. Apr. 15, 1756

discussion of the problems in Pennsylvania caused by

the lure of scalping rewards. June 14, 1756

the problems caused by scalping parties discussed.

June 17, 1756

offer for scalps to be taken. Sept. 10, 1756

Teedyuscung inquiring why warriors can not be paid just

like the English soldiers, suggesting at least a

reward for scalps. Aug. 7, 1757

BOUQUET, Henry

Treaty with Delawares. Referred to at conference at

Pittsburgh. Jan. 3-8, 1759 (I)

present at councils at the Forks of the Muskingham.

Dec. 5, 1764

letter to, from William Johnson. Re: Bradstreet's

articles of peace with the Indians. Dec. 6, 1764

BOUVORZ, Marion

signer of a petition of the Jesuits of New France, asking

for authority to hold in their own name certain Indian

lands conceded to them. [1701]

BOUVAS, J.

Superior of the Jesuits, actions discussed at councils

in Albany. Oct. 17, 1700

BOWDANCE. See BOCCALOONS.

BOWEN,

Lieutenant present at Six Nations meeting at Niagara

Dec. 11, 1782, enclosed in. July 13, 1783

BOWL

imagery employed by Six Nations meeting with Governor

of Canada at Montreal. Mar. 28, 1757

BOWMAN, Baronat

an Onondaga, present at the first councils at Easton.

July 31, 1756

BOWYER, Colonel

prospective buyer of lands around Green Bay sought by

the Indians of New York from the Menominee, his offer

to purchase was refused permission by the Office of

Indian Affairs. Feb. 8, 1831

BOYD, George

United States Indian (Colonel) agent for the Oneidas of

Wisconsin. Present at treaty of United States with

Oneidas of Wisconsin. Sept. 16, 1836

United States agent in Wisconsin. Aug. 27, 1836

BRADDOCK

discussion of Braddock's defeat relative to maintaining

the faith of Indians in the British interest. Apr. 23,

1755 (II)

speech from, to Six Nations. May 17, [1755] (II)

speech to "Chief Men and Warriors of the Six Nations".

July 10, 1755 (II)

his speech sent to Indians at Mount Johnson councils.

July 21, 1755

praise for Six Nations Indians fighting under Braddock

in a council held in Philadelphia. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec.

2, 1792

Scaroyady in speech comments on the defeat of Braddock.

Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

appointed William Johnson superintendent of Indian

affairs for the Northern Department (English),

according to William Johnson. Aug. 8, 1755

Shirley letters about Braddock's defeat. Aug. 15, 1755

Braddock's attitudes about Indians elaborated by

Scaroyady. Aug. 22, 1755

Morris in a letter to Johnson discussed Braddock's

defeat. Nov. 14, 1755

Johnson being given the same powers as Braddock. Feb.

4, 1756

French influence after the defeat of Braddock. Dec. 8,

1756

BRADSHAW, Captain

listed as Sheriff; present at a council with Seneca and

Mohawk held in Albany. Sept. 2-4, 1691

present at councils at Albany. Sept. 4, 1691

BRADSTREET, General

discussed in the councils at the Forks of the Muskingham.

Dec. 5, 1764

BRADSTREET, John (or SCANO)

a Captain, who sent a message to William Shirley to ask

him to hurry his expedition to Niagara as a French

attack on Oswego was expected. July 10, 1755

William Johnson urges the Six Nations to join Bradstreet

at German Flats for a military expedition. July 22,

1758

a Lieutenant Colonel, who was to be joined by Brigadeer

General John Stanwix and William Johnson at German

Flats for an expedition against the French. July 30-

Aug. 2, 1758

Bradstreet's Articles of Peace. Aug. 12, 1764

William Johnson's remarks on the conduct of Colonel

Bradstreet. Nov. 24, 1764

William Johnson comments on Bradstreet's articles of

peace with the Indians, in a letter to Henry Bouquet.

Dec. 6, 1764

speech of Indian deputies of the Five Nations. Re:

Hardenbergh Patent. Also, letter from J. Bradstreet

to the Oneidas. n.d. [1769]

has applied to General Thomas Gage for payment of

account of money spent during negotiations of Treaty

at Fort Stanwix. Apr. 23, 1769

letter from William Johnson to John Bradstreet. Re:

dispute over Hardenbergh Patent. May 17, 1769

letter from, to William Johnson. Re: Hardenbergh

Patent. [May 6, 1770]

BRADT, Johannis

Indian boy in his care asked to be returned. Nov. 25,

1751

BRAND (or ARUCHIADECKKA)

See also CANAGARADOUGHQUA.

one of the Mohawk headmen meeting with Weiser. Oct.

11, 1750

named by Weiser as one of the leaders of the Mohawk.

Oct. 4, 1753

BRANDT (or CONAGARATUCHQUA)

said to be considering going to the French, considered

his error, Mohawk. Oct. 17, 1700

present for discussions between the Pennsylvania

Provisional Council and Hendrick. Jan. 17, 1755

BRANDT, Abram (or CACHYACHO)

present at councils with the Mohawks in Philadelphia.

Jan. 20, 1755

BRANDT, Joseph (or THAYENDANEGEN; THAYENDANEGEO;

TOHANAWELA)

See also BRANT, Joseph; THAYEADANEGE.

signer of a receipt from the Six Nations to Thomas and

Richard Penn for payment for lands ceded at Treaty at

Fort Stanwix. July 28, 1769

signed the Five Nation's Land Deed to Phelps and

Gorham. July 8, 1788 (I)

signed letter to Congress from Five Nations re: land

sales to New York and Massachusetts June and Winter

1788. Mohawk signed name Joseph Brant and Tohanawela.

June 2, 1789

signed supplement to treaty at Buffalo Creek with

Phelps and Gorham. Aug. 4, 1789

witness to an agreement of ratification by the Onondagas

June 16, 1790 at Fort Stanwix. Apr. 19, 1793

spoke for England. Wanted to know when the British will

aid them in their fight against the Virginians. Oct.

11-14, 1794

signer of a treaty between the Mohawks and the United

States. Mar. 29, 1797

BRANDYWINE

land purchases in 1737 affirmed. July 13, 1757

BRANS, Thomas. See TROLEEANDEE.

BRANT,

Captain present at Conference with Six Nations at

Niagara. July, 1783

BRANT, John

present at council of Six Nations. (Grand River) with

William Claus at Hamilton. Brant presented deed from

Haldimand to Six Nations for land on Grand River as

evidence of Six Nations claims to land on the Grand

River. July 4, 1819

an interpreter, present at a general council of the Six

Nations, held at "the Mohawk village". Previously

sent to England by the Six Nations to settle doubts

about Six Nations title to Grand River lands.

Appointed to succeed Tekerahoga, "the principal Chief

of the Mohawks." Nephew of Tekerahoga. July 3-4, 1828

BRANT, Joseph

See also BRANDT, Joseph; THAYEADANEGE; THAYENDONNEKEN.

interpreter. n.d. (July, 1777)

letter from, to Daniel Claus. Apr. 11, 1781

delivered speech from Six Nations to Frederick Haldimand.

May 27, 1783

present at Six Nations council at Niagara Dec. 11, 1782,

mentioned in letter from Maclean to Haldimand as being

upset over Shawnee massacre Dec. 16, 1782, delivered

speech to Fred Haldimand May 21, 1783 concerning

Treaty of Paris; all included in. July 3, 1783

Six Nations deputy, Council at Sandusky. Oct. 14, 1783

reported to the Mohawks settled at Lachine. Apr. 7, 1784

has paid for a picture of John Hill and David Hill. Nov.

6, 1784

present at treaty at Buffalo Creek. [July, 1788]

witnessed signing, and also signed, deed from Five

Nations to Phelps and Gorham. July 8, 1788 (I)

witnessed signing of agreement by Phelps and Gorham for

payment to Five Nations for land ceded. July 9, 1788

witness to an agreement of ratification by the Cauygas

June 22, 1790 at Fort Stanwix. Apr. 19, 1793

Mohawk signer to the Treaty with the Mohawk at Albany

for the relinquishment of their claims to all lands.

Mar. 29, 1797

signed treaty with New York State. Mar. 29, 1797

letter from, to Oliver Phelps re: agreement between

the Indians of Grand River and the Connecticut

Company. Dec. 27, 1800; Feb. 20, 1802

presented documentation for John Johnson that Grand

Island had been ceded to Johnson. Little Billy does

not recognize the validity of this documentation.

Sept. 16, 1810

given grant to lands on Grand River for Six Nations by

General Haldimand. July 4, 1819

BRANT, Thomas

signer to the Treaty at Camp Holmes. Aug. 24, 1835

BRANTD. See CANAGARADOUGHQUA; GAWEAGHNOGE;

KARUNGHIADECKHA.

BREACH

complaint that the belts of Wampum were not binding the

Indians to the performance of their promises. Oct.

5-14, 1745

Lord Bellomont described by the Mohawks as breaking a

deed of sale of lands. July 16, 1710

illegal settlement by Euro-Americans described as a

breach of former proposals. June 25-July 3, 1744

breaking of promises by Indians discussed. Nov. 30,

1745

BREAD, Cornelius

an Oneida war chief who signed a broadside in defense

of Eleazar Williams. July 18, 1826

BREAD, Daniel

an Oneida chief of Oneida, Wisconsin who signed a broad-

side in defense of Eleazar Williams. July 18, 1826

representative of the Oneida and part of a memorial to

Congress protesting the Treaty with the Menominee

concerning the removal of Indians from New York.

Feb. 8, 1831

represented Oneida and signed letter of protest re:

Treaty at Washington Feb. 8, 1831. Apr. 13, 1831

an Oneida Indian of Green Bay, Wisconsin who signed a

treaty with the United States. Sept. 16, 1836

an Oneida Indian of Green Bay, a member of the First

Christian Party of Oneidas. He signed a treaty with

the United States. Feb. 3, 1838

BREAD, Peter. See KANADAROK.

BRENSON, Bearefort

witness and interpreter for a deed dated Aug., 1737

enclosed in the proceedings of the councils at Easton.

July 21-Aug. 7, 1757

BREVOORT, (Major) H.B. (or BREVORT, H.B.)

United States Indian Agent noted to be rigid and

tyrannical. Aug. 26-Sept. 13, 1824

BREVOORT, H.B. See BREVOORT, (Major) H.B.

BREWER, (Captain)

commander of an expedition that has been joined by some

Mohegans. May 9, 1758

BRIDGES, Ann

claims to hold a Letter Patent to Kayaderosseras,

granted in 1708. Mar. 15, 1765

BRIGHAM, Paul

prepared committee report on claim of Iroquois Indians

to hunting ground in Vermont (1798, 1812). 1854

BRIGHTON, Sampson Sheldon

name on a deed. July 22, 1754

BRIGHTWELL, John

deserter from the Royal Americans, a captive discussed

at Lancaster. Aug. 19, 1762

BRISAY, Jacques-Rene de, Marquis de Denonville

reference to the second attack made on Six Nations by a

Governor of New France in 1687. Nov. 17, 1753

mentioned as N'Denonville who lead attacks on the Seneca.

July 22, 1754

BRISAY de Denonville, Jacques-René de

succeeded M. de La Barre as Lieutenant General (governor

general) of New France. Declared war against the

Iroquois. 1655-[1687]

BRISBAY, Jacques-Rene' de, Marquis de Dononville

Governor of New France, a letter mentioned in Dongan

councils with the Six Nations. Apr. 29, 1688

BRISBAY DE DENNONVILLE, Jacques-Rene de

problems with Governor of Canada discussed. Sept.

18-21, 1688 (III)

all French actions coming from the Governor of Canada

(Onondijo). Mar. 7, 1689

BRISH, Henry G.

sub-agent to the Senecas of Ohio; mentioned to receive

a land grant under the Treaty with the Senecas of

Ohio held in Washington. Feb. 28, 1831

BRITISH

George Morgan of United States says British policy is

to pit people against each other until they become

weak. Apr. 7, 1777

BRITISH PARTY

one group of Indians at St. Regis. Nov. 3, 1855

BROADHEAD, Charles

letter about the Connecticut claim. Feb. 20, 1754

the ambiguity of Broadhead's message discussed in the

second series of councils at Easton. Aug. 7, 1755-

Dec. 3, 1792

instructed to help gather Indians in the Susquehannah

area to a council at John Harris' in Jan., 1856.

Dec. 8, 1755

inhabitant of the province of Pennsylvania, who

reportedly brought a message to Teedyuscung, accusing

the Delawares of committing hostilities against the

English. July-Nov. 1756

involvements in the affairs of the Susquehannah region

discussed in the councils at Easton. Nov. 6-17, 1756

charges Teedyuscung with involvement with murders done

by the Delaware. Nov. 14, 1756

accusations discussed. Nov. 15, 1756 (I)

charges dismissed. Nov. 15, 1756 (I)

BROADHURST, Jonathan

present at councils in Albany. (July 19, 1701)

BROADWAY

personal name employed for the government of New York

by the Six Nations, Mohegans and Scatacooks at council

at Boston. Aug. 22-Sept. 20, 1723

term of address used at councils in Deerfield. Aug. 27-

Sept. 1, 1735

held up as example of defrauding lands of Six Nations.

Oct. 5-14, 1745

"BROADWAY". See BOSTON.

BROCK,

a British general who promised Indian allies a share in

property secured at the taking of the garrison of

Detroit. Mar. 26-28, 1819

BROCKDEW, C.

clerk entering a deed for 1736, Philadelphia. July 21-

Aug. 7, 1757

clerk entering a deed for 1737, Philadelphia. July 21-

Aug. 7, 1757

BROCKHOLLS, Captain

letter from Captain Salisbury about Mohawk activities.

June 27, 1678

letter to Salisbury about Mohawk taking prisoner Natick

Indians. July 20, 1678

letter from Salisbury about Mohawks only treating in

Albany. July 23, 1678

letter from Salisbury on Indian Affairs. July 25, 1678

mentioned in message. Nov. 9, 1680

present at councils with Mohawks. Nov. 9-10, 1680

part of arrangements for Mohawk propositions. Nov. 16,

1680

BROCKHOLLS, Major

mentioned at councils at Albany. June 24, 1687

BROEK, Wessel van (or VON BROOK; WESSELL TEN BROOKE)

present at a council to consider propositions of four of

the Five Nations. May 16, 1698

called in to participate in a council with Five Nations

in Albany. Feb. 3-6, 1699

Alderman of the city of Albany; proceedings of the

Commissioners and the Five Nations

BROKEN KETTLE. See CANAJACHONAH.

BROKEN THIGH

identified as Mohawk, attended the councils at Carlisle.

Jan. 29, 1756

present at councils in Philadelphia in the spring of

1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

refused to leave Aucquick when the village was evacuated.

Jan. 29, 1756

present at a council in Philadelphia. Mar. 27, 1756

BROKEN TOMAHAWK. See OTACHSAKA.

BROKEN TWIG. See TWANIAS.

BRONSON, E.

present at councils in Albany. Aug. 28, 1695 (II)

BRONSON, ISSAC

purchaser of lands involved in the Treaty with the

Senecas at Buffalo Creek. June 30, 1802 (II)

BROOK, Wessell von. See BROEK, Wessel van.

BROOKE, Chidley

representative of New York, present at councils in

Albany. Aug. 15-20, 1694

BROOKE, Henry

present at councils in Philadelphia with Conestogas.

May 4, 1722

BROOKE, Robert, Jr.

present at Treaty at Lancaster. July 2, 1744

BROOKE, Wessell ten. See BROEK, Wessel van.

BROOKE, Wesselson

present at councils in Albany. May 16, 1698 (II)

BROOKES, Robert

present at councils at Lancaster. June 30, 1744

BROOME, Jn.

present when Philip Livingston, William Livingston,

and Walter Rutherford signed a quit claim, releasing

land to the Mohawk. Nov. 22, 1763

"BROTHER"

in a speech in Philadelphia Kanichhungo spoke of the

tribes in the league and how Six Nations were the

"elder brethern" and that these peoples acted in

concert with Six Nations. Oct. 2, 1736

term of address discussed. Sept. 18-21, 1688 (II)

meaning expounded upon. Oct. 16, 1721

Six Nations seeking to be an older Brother to the English

because lands were theirs before they ever belonged to

the English. July 24, 1744

commissioners present at councils in Albany referred to

as brothers. July 22, 1764

Shawnee referred to as younger brother by Six Nations.

July 3, 1783

in speech at prisoner exchange Major Walls spoke of being

oldest brothers. Oct. 14, 1783

Joseph Brant uses term when addressing council at

Sandusky. Oct. 14, 1783

Six Nations addressed as older brother by Lake Indians.

Oct. 14, 1783

BROTHERS

Six Nations about being no longer called brothers, but

rather children. Aug. 30-Sept. 1, 1686 (II)

BROTHERTOCARANDOWANA

Oneida, present at councils in Philadelphia. Aug. 23,

1732

BROTHERTON

where General Council was held Apr. 13, 1831 to write

letter of protest to Governor Throop of New York re:

Treaty at Washington Feb. 8, 1831. Apr. 18, 1831 (I)

& (II)

BROTHERTON INDIANS (or BROTHERTOWN)

See also NEW ENGLAND INDIANS.

Indians of New England who were granted a tract of land

by the Oneidas. Oct. 4, 1774

reserved tract of land in Treaty of Oneidas with New

York State. Sept. 22, 1788

reference to setting aside a reservation for the

Brotherton New England Indians and the role of Samuel

Occum. Apr. 19, 1793

letter of certification that Delawares will allow the

Brotherton to share land with them on the White River

in Indiana. Oct. 2, 1817

are believed by Eleazar Williams to be willing to pay a

sum for removal to Green Bay, Wisconsin. Apr. 10, 1824

want to buy land from Waupanokus which they have already

purchased from the Menominees. Aug. 26-Sept. 13, 1824

President decides the Brothertown should be included in

the Council regarding the Treaty of Prairie Du Chien.

Aug. 19, 1825

to be peacefully reestablished in Green Bay. Mar. 27,

1827

consist of Mohegans, Montouk, Stonington, Narragansette,

Pequots and Nahantick. Formerly New England Indians.

Name taken in 1774. Petition to Andrew Jackson that

the United States commissioners have not given them

enough land on the Fox River to pursue agriculture.

In Thomas Dean Journal. Dec. 27, 1830

deposition re: $950 payment for land to Menominee.

(1831?)

mentioned in the articles attached to the Treaty with

the Menominee concerning the relocation of the New

York Indians. Feb. 8, 1831

represented at General Council at Brothertown which sent

letter of protest to Governor Throop re: land

settlement on the Fox River by the Treaty at

Washington. Feb. 8, 1831; Apr. 13, 1831

Governor Porter of Michigan goes to Green Bay to meet

with Menominees. Re: troubles with Stockbridge,

Brotherton and Oneida Indians. Oct. 9, 1832

treaty with the Six Nations at Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15,

1838

BROUGHTON, Sampson

claims to hold a Letter Patent to Kayaderosseras,

granted in 1708. Mar. 15, 1765

BROWER, Peter

was "sold" a piece of land by some Mohawks "for the Term

of 999 years". [Dec. 21-22, 1773]

BROWN, Benjamin S.

witness to the Treaty with the mixed band of Senecas and

Shawnee at Lewistown. July 20, 1831

BROWN, James

Indian trader; present at councils at Loggstown. Aug.

12, 1751

BROWN, Thomas

present for conversations at house of Israel Pemberton

in spring of 1756. Aug. 7, 1755-Dec. 3, 1792

BROWNING, Lieutenant Colonel William

present at councils at Niagara. Aug. 30, 1764

BROWNSTONE, COUNCIL AT

Six Nations promised military assistance by British

against Virginians. Oct. 11-14, 1794

BROWNSTOWN

Council of Indians--Wyandots, Delewares, Shawnees,

Ojibwas, Potawatomis, Six Nations. Sept. 26, 1810

council at. Oct. 11-14, 1794

[speech from Wyandots, Delewares, Shawnees, Ojibwas,

Potawatomis, Six Nations to the Shawnees residing on

the Wabash River.] Sept. 26, 1810

near Detroit. Report of council at. Sept. 30, 1810 (I)

council at, attended by Senecas. Sept. 30, 1810 (II)

BROTHERTOWN, GENERAL COUNCIL AT

drafted letter of appeal to Governor Enos T. Throop

regarding the land designated to them by the United

States agents on Fox River. Particularly disturbed

that the Brotherton were not consulted about Treaty

at Washington Feb. 8, 1831 between the Menominee and

the United States in which they gave 500,000 acres to

United States for $20,000. Felt they had right to

this land by purchase and the charity of the Menominee..

Brotherton, Stockbridge and Oneida at this council.

Requested Governor to advise the State Legislature to

look into their rights. Apr. 13, 1831

BROTHERTOWN INDIANS. See BROTHERTON INDIANS.

BRUYAS, Father

French indications that this priest and Lamberville

would be supplied to the Five Nations if the Five

Nations would council formally with the French.

Mar. 21, 1699

BUCHSHINUTHA

Shawneese representative to councils at Fort Pitt. Aug.

12-15, 1760

BUCK

See also CROGHAN, George.

name given to George Croghan by the Indians. Used at

Loggstown. May 28-June 13, 1752

BUCK CREEK

Oneida Reservation near Green Bay, Wisconsin. Sept. 16,

1836

BUCKINGHAM, J.S.

witness to the Tuscarora submission to changes in the

Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BUCKINGHAM, Leicester S.

witness to the Tuscarora submission to changes in terms

of the Treaty of Buffalo Creek. Jan. 15, 1838

BUCKWORTH, (Captain)

present at an Indian conference at Fort Johnson. Feb.

2-27, 1756

BUFFALO CREEK (or TEYOHEGHSCOLEA)

Senecas, Onondagas and Cayugas claim that the principal

council fire of the Six Nations is at Buffalo Creek,

not at Onondaga. Nov. 4, 1812

treaty held at, at request of Six Nations. The place for

the treaty was originally set at Kanadasegea by the

delegates from Massachusetts. The Six Nations,

however, requested that the treaty be held at Buffalo

Creek. [July, 1788]

deed from Five Nations to Phelps and Gorham executed at

Buffalo Creek. July 8, 1788 (I) & (II)

Phelps and Gorham agree to pay compensation to Five

Nations for land ceded at. July 9, 1788

land sold to New York at Council at Buffalo Creek June

1788 deemed sacred to Five Nations. Letter to Congress.

June 2, 1789

supplement to Treaty at (July 1788). Aug. 4, 1789

Indians from, at council (at Newtown--Painted Post).

July 18, 1791

council at. Account of expenses. June 25, 1796

council at, re: sending Iroquois representatives to

Washington. Seneca village of, will send no

representatives. Jan. 15, 1815

treaty at, Senecas cede islands in the Niagara River to

New York State. Sept. 13, 1815

BUFFALO CREEK, INDENTURE AT

indenture at Buffalo Creek by the Senecas. June 30, 1802

BUFFALO CREEK, TREATY AT

treaty with the Senecas at Buffalo Creek. June 30,

1802 (II)

treaty with the Six Nations of New York Indians

exchanging lands in Wisconsin for lands in Indian

Territory. Jan. 15, 1838

BUFFALOE CREEK, COUNCIL AT

land sold to New York and Massachusetts deemed a sacred

obligation by the Five Nations because chiefs were

represented. Felt they had to sell to preserve peace

despite previous unauthorized sale by O Ball

(Cornplanter) to New York. June 2, 1789

letter written to Congress by Five Nations requesting

payment for land sold to New York at Council at

Buffaloe Creek in June 1788 and denying sale of land

to Peter Ryckman in Albany. June 2, 1789

Captain O'Ball represents Six Nations and requests

territory of the United States. June 18, 1794

cornplanter, a Seneca Chief requests land from United

States President Washington or is prepared for

military action. July 4, 1794

BULL (Captain Bull)

chosen to return messages and wampum to the Ohio country

from the councils at Easton. Oct. 21, 1758 (II)

a Delaware Indian. Apr. 6, 1764

BULL, John

representative of the Pennsylvania Council of Safety at

the Treaty at Easton. Jan. 30-Feb. 6, 1777

BULL, William

Commissioner of South Carolina, present at councils in

Albany. Nov. 25, 1751

BULLS, Mr.

discussion about a "fort" of this man. Sept. 10, 1756

BUNDERSPEIGEL, Captain

present for the first councils at Easton. Aug. 7, 1755-

Dec. 3, 1792

BUNT (or CHENUGHIATA)

See also BANT; OTSINUGHYADA.

signed the land grant and boundary line ratification

for the Onondaga. Nov. 5, 1768

BUNYAN, George

attested copy of proceedings. Nov. 2, 1753

BURD, Colonel James

present at the treaty councils with the Six Nations at

Fort Pitt. Aug. 12-15, 1760

BURGES, Loratt

letter from James Turner, to Loratt Burges, offering

Burges a commission to carry into effect the law for

the relief of the Tuscaroras. Jan. 10, 1803

letter from, to James Turner, Governor of North

Carolina. Re: Burges refuses commission to carry

into effect the law for the relief of the Tuscaroras.

Jan. 15, 1803

BURLINGTON, COUNCILS AT

discussion of upcoming councils at Burlington. Aug. 4,

1758

this council discussed before hand in Philadelphia.

Aug. 5, 1758

proceedings of councils at Burlington. Aug. 7, 1758;

Aug. 8, 1758

Tagheskata claimed not to remember the happenings of

the councils at Burlington. Oct. 8, 1758

BURLINGTON INVITATION BELT

white belt with three figures at one end representing

the Shawnees, Delawares, and Mingos with a line

running to four other figures at the other end standing

for the Six Nations in their own country. The figures

are anthropomorphic--said to be a unity belt. Aug. 7,

1758

reference seemingly made to this belt at the councils at

Easton. Oct. 8, 1758

BURMAN, Robert (or BURMANN)

recorder for proceedings between Commissioners from

Maryland and representatives of the Five Nations. Aug.

3-13, 1682 (I) & (II)

BURMANN, Robert. See BURMAN, Robert.

BURNET, William

present at councils in Albany. Oct. 16, 1721

treaty between the Governors of New York, Virginia, and

Pennsylvania and the Five Nations. Aug. 14-Dec. 1,

1722

messages sent for meetings with Six Nations. Sept., 1722

reference to meetings with Burnet the previous fall.

May 23-June 4, 1723

mentioned in passing in report of Massachusetts

Commissioners. Sept. 28, 1724

present at councils in Albany. Dec. 4, 1726

Governor and commander-in-chief of the Province of New

York. Land granted to Burnet's daughter Mary by a

letter patent dated Nov. 13, 1731 was released to the

Mohawks by several owners of the tract. Nov. 22, 1763

BURNET BROWN, William

part-owner of a trace of land released to the Mohawks.

Nov. 22, 1763

has promised to release his holdings in the Canajohary

Patent. [----1772]

BURNETT, Mary

received a deed of a tract of land, signed by four

Mohawk sachems of Canajohary. Feb. 16, 1729/30

land granted to Mary Burnett by a letter patent dated

Nov. 13, 1731. Was released to the Mohawks by several

owners of the tract. Daughter of William Burnet,

Governor of New York. Nov. 22, 1763

BURNETT'S HILLS

mentioned in the description of boundaries in the

boundary line of 1765. Nov. 5, 1768

BURNEY, Thomas

delivered a letter from the Twightwees to Virginia.

June 21, 1752

sent by Virginia with messages to Half King and

Monakatootah with a report about Loggstown. June 22,

1753

message of Burney's discussed. Nov. 17, 1753

BURNING BERRY. See OSHONTOY.

BURNT HIS BODY. See YOUWAUTOWTOYOU.

BURTON,

gave an order for a survey of boundaries between the

village of Caughnawaga and the land of René Cartié.

Oct. 3, 1770

BURTON, Lieutenant Colonel

appointed for an interview. Sept. 10, 1756

BURWELL, James

a memember of the Virginia House of Burgesses, who was

given a copy of Governor Alexander Spotswood's address

to the House of Burgess so that he might thank the

Governor for this speech. Apr. 23, 1718

BUSHLOPERS

to be dismissed, needed only in the summer. Sept. 28,

1697 (III)

BUT DES MORTS, TREATY AT. See BUTTE DES MORTS.

BUTLER,

attended a meeting of Mohawks with William Johnson at

Mount Johnson. May 15-16, 1755

requests Indians to join against the United States with

the British. May 16, 1777

British Colonel at the Council of Niagara. July 12, 1791

BUTLER, Captain

present at councils at Mount Johnson. July 21, 1755

served as an interpreter at an Indian conference at the

Camp at Lake George. Sept. 4, 1755

present as interpreter at the Council at Fort George.

Aug. 31-Sept. 4, 1755

present at a conference at Fort Johnson. Feb. 2-27,

1756; Sept. 15-20, 1757

present at a meeting at Fort Johnson with Oneidas,

Oquagas, and other Indians living on the Susquehanna

River. Aug. 23-26, 1757

BUTLER, John, Captain

present at an Indian conference at Fort Johnson. [Mar.

11-14, 1758]

sent by William Johnson to hurry along the Six Nations

to a meeting at Fort Johnson. June 24-July 1, 1758

BUTLER, Colonel

purchased land from the Missasagas July 4, 1819, on the

Crand River. Member of a land board at Niagara (1791)

BUTLER, General

killed in battle Nov. 4, 1791 between States and West

Indians. Dec. 5, 1791

BUTLER, Lieutenant

of Captain Rugherfurd's Company, attended a meeting of

Mohawks with William Johnson at Mount Johnson. May

15-16, 1755

of Rutherford's Company who was present when William

Johnson delivered a speech to the Mohawks. May 17,

[1755] (II)

present when William Johnson delivered a speech to the

Mohawks. May 17, 1755 (II)

BUTLER, Lieutenant Colonel

present at Six Nations conference at Niagara to remove

doubts about future peace. 1783

present at Six Nations meeting at Niagara Dec. 11, 1782,

enclosed in. July 3, 1783

BUTLER, John

present at a meeting of Senecas at Fort Johnson. July

28, 1758

a Justice of the Peace for the County of Albany. Present

at a meeting at Canajohary. Re: Canajohary Patent.

Mar. 10, 1763

interpreter for Six Nations at congress held by William

Johnson to discuss peace between Six Nations and

Cherokee. Mar. 7-12, 1768

interpreter for the Canadian Indians, present at

councils at Johnson Hall. Apr. 4, 1768

served as interpreter at a meeting of the Mohawks with

Governor Henry Moore at Johnson Hall. Re:

Kayaderosseras Patent. Sept. 20, 1768

served as interpreter when Abraham alias Teyorhansera,

speaker for the Mohawks delivered a speech to the

Albany Corporation at Johnson Hall. Dec. 21, 1773

served as interpreter at a meeting of the Mohawks with

the Albany Corporation at Johnson Hall. [Dec. 21-22,

1773]

present at Council held at Niagara. n.d. (held after

July 1777)

letter to, from Edward Pollard, re: Senecas upset at

British troops leaving Ontario. n.d. (after Oct.,

1777)

deputy agent, witnessed signing of deed from Five Nations

to Phelps and Gorham. July 8, 1788 (I)

witnessed signing of agreement by Phelps and Gorham for

payment to Five Nations for land ceded. July 9, 1788

BUTLER, Richard

Commissioner for the United States for councils at Fort

Stanwix. Oct. 22, 1784

Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the United States at

Treaty at Fort Stanwix. Oct. 23, 1784

Commissioner for the United States at councils with Six

Nations at Fort Harmar. Jan. 9, 1789

present at councils at Fort Harmar. Jan. 9, 1789

BUTLER, Thomas, Captain

present at a meeting at Fort Johnson with Oneidas,

Oquagas and other Indians living on the Susquehanna

River. Aug. 23-26, 1757

present at an Indian conference at Fort Johnson. [Mar.

11-14, 1758]

sent by William Johnson to hurry along the Canajohary

Mohwaks to a meeting with William Johnson at Fort

Johnson. June 24-July 1, 1758

BUTLER, Thomas

present at a meeting with people of each of the Six

Nations except Cayugas, at Fort Johnson. July 22, 1758

sent with a message from William Johnson to the Mohawk

Castle. July 30-Aug. 2, 1758

BUTTE DES MORTS, TREATY AT (or BUT DES MORTS)

Menominees ceded tract of land six miles wide on each

side of Fox River to the United States. Reserves

the claim of the New York Indians, Brotherton and

Menominee to land held in common on Fox River which

was part of the land ceded. A United States

commission is to divide the land between them.

Brotherton petition the President because the

commissioners did not give them enough land when sent

to Green Bay in 1829. Dec. 27, 1830

instructions given by the War Department to United States

Commissioners on how to affix land boundaries between

the Menominee, Winnebago, and New York Indians

according to this treaty. States the New York Indians

thought they had the right to land by purchase in 1821,

while the Winnebago and Menominee had only granted

them permission to sit down among them. Article II

of the Treaty empowers the United States Commissioners

to decide the boundaries with the United States

President's approval. "No more to be taken from the

first and given to the last than will...promote the

comfort to the last/" Notes that hunters require

more land than agriculturalists. Government does not

wish Indians to return to hunting. June 9, 1830

copy and related documents presented in the materials

found with the Treaty with the Menominee. Feb. 8,

1831

letter to New York Governor Throop from the Brotherton

"our lands were wrongfully bought by the commissioners

of 1827. The President and the Senate in their

constitutional action...might have...defined the rights

of all parties, this was not done but the subject left

more perplexed by the conditional ratification of the

acts of the commissioners thus prolonging the

controversy and inviting a renewal of attacks and

calumnies for years. Apr. 13, 1831 (I) & (II)

BUTTON GEORGE. See SAHHUGAE.

BYRD, Colonel

agreements with Five Nations in 1687 recalled in

discussions at Fort George. Aug. 14-Dec. 1, 1722

BYRNE, Michael

stationed at Fort Ontario. Wrote a letter to William

Johnson re: a speech sent by Kayashoto to the Six

Nations to the effect that English movements around

Fort Pitt are suspicious. Oct. 2, 1767

Commissary of Indian Affairs, present at councils at

Johnson Hall. Apr. 4, 1768

BYSAW

a Seneca granted lands in the forty eight mile square

tract at Lewistown. Sept. 29, 1817