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Music Manuscripts: Series 4: Part 4: British Library, London: Section B: English Manuscripts, c.1640-1714


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About this Collection

Music Mss from the Great English Collections: Series IV British Library

Introduction: Music Manuscripts from the Great EnglishCollections: Series 4: The Music Manuscript Collection of the British Library,London: Parts 1-13

 

General Preface -Parts One and Two: Polyphonic Music Before c.1640, Sections A and B

 

Harvester Microform (now Primary Source Microfilm, animprint of Thomson/Gale) are proud and privileged to be continuing their seriesof music manuscript collections with that in the

British Library. This rich collection is so large that wehave divided it into broad areas. Initially we are concentrating on PolyphonicMusic Manuscripts before about 1640, and these will be published in twosections, Section A appearing in Part One and Section B in Part Two. This Guidegives a detailed listing of mss as well as the contents of each reel in PartsOne and Two. An Index of names and composers appears at the end. The Series isunder the editorial direction of Professor Roger Bray of the University ofLancaster.

 

Series One is based on the music collection in the BodleianLibrary; Series Two contains the magnificent collection of St. MichaelsCollege, Tenbury, also housed at the Bodleian Library, Oxford; Series Three isthe extensive music collection of Christ Church, Oxford.

 

Parts One and Two of this Fourth Series include manuscriptsranging from the earliest polyphonic fragments to music of the major Tudor andJacobean composers, as well as a host of continental and minor composers. Manymanuscripts are reproduced in their entirety. There are however numerousoccasions when only selected folios have been reproduced, and this is clearlyindicated in both the listing of manuscripts and the Contents of Reels.

 

The Hughes-Hughes three volume. Catalogue of ManuscriptMusic in the British Library, almost out of print, has been reproduced onthe first reel as an aid to users.

 

Under the watchful eye of Roger Bray we must againacknowledge the care, attention and skill of Violet Richardson and Mavis Thomasat all stages in the preparation of this Listing and Guide. We must also thankthe British Library for all the help and encouragement they have given.

 

Introduction - PartsOne and Two

 

Scholars of Medieval and Renaissance music will be entirelyfamiliar with the manuscripts owned by the British Library. In this firstsection we include all the polyphony before c.1640, together with the fewmonophonic (non-plainsong) sources and several manuscripts containingtreatises, selected to include the major theorists of the period. The BritishLibrary is of course the richest repository of sources of British music of thisperiod, and also possesses several important sources of Continental music, someof them of British (usually English) provenance. I have not attempted toseparate the British from the Continental music and this publication has simplybeen divided into two sections by call-number. The terminal date (c.1640) leadsto some inconsistencies, the chief being Jenkins (who is excluded) and theLawes brothers (William is included, Henry generally not); music of theCommonwealth period and later has been left for a further planned visit to theLibrarys archives. Similarly, one or two late (but respectable) sources whichtransmit Tudor and early Stuart music have been included.

 

The British Librarys collection is a tribute to itsnineteenth-century librarians in particular. They seem to have acquired almosteverything of our period that seemed to be of any significance, at a time whenmanuscripts were still passing between private collectors much more frequentlythan today. The Librarys own publications (and in particular the variouscatalogues of additions) give the immediate provenance of their manuscripts,and further details of those manuscripts which have been of particular interestto scholars are found in more recent writings.

 

In this booklet I have attempted to summarise the contentsof each manuscript. This is no easy task, for the Hughes-Hughes Cataloguecategorised the contents, sometimes erroneously (e.g. the heading Motet,which includes such forms as Respond and Antiphon), but nevertheless a verygreat deal of his work has not yet been superseded and is therefore the basisfor my descriptions. I have attempted to indicate the main types and forms ofmusic in each manuscript, and to include the name of every composer represented.

 

An indication of the importance of the manuscripts is thenumber that have acquired affectionate nicknames. Thus we find included in thispublication Tregians Anthology, Cosyns Virginal Book, Baldwins CommonplaceBook, Will Fosters Virginal Book, the Lumley Part-books, the FayrfaxManuscript, Ritsons Manuscript, Elizabeth Rogers Virginal Book, the GyffardPart-books, the Robertsbridge Codex, Thomas Myriells Tristitiae Remedium,the Mulliner Book, King Henry VIIIs Manuscript, John Stuarts Lute-book, theFountains Fragments, and the Old Hall Manuscripts, together with manuscriptswhich are immediately recognised by their call-number (e.g. Egerton 3307,Harley 978, Lansdowne 763, and Additional 29987, 29996, 31390, etc.).

 

Scholars will be familiar with the problems of monochromereproduction of manuscripts containing significant use of coloured notation.There are very few such MSS of this type here, but the use of coloured notationin, for example, Additional 57950 (The Old Hall Manuscript) is extremelyimportant, and, while the grey appearance of red notes is a useful guide,exclusive use of microfilm in the preparation of an edition can lead to errorsunless extreme caution is taken.

 

In this Listing and Guide I give, for each manuscript, abrief description of the contents, together with names of composers, followedby a date, and followed in brackets by an exact page reference to the relevantentries in Hughes-Hughess Catalogue (which is produced on Reel One) and toother publications if they have been a major source for my informationadditional to Hughes-Hughes. For details of abbreviations, see below.Composers names have been standardised as far as possible according to TheNew Grove, but readers are warned that it is still sometimes difficult todistinguish between the various Johnsons (and even the various R. Johnsons),between Ferrabosco father and son (here identified as I and II), and evenoccasionally between William Mundy and his son John.

 

Abbreviations

 

Part-books
A -- Altus
B -- Bassus or Bass
C -- Cantus
Ct -- Contratenor or Countertenor
M -- Medius
Q -- Quintus
S -- Superius
Sx -- Sextus
T -- Tenor
Tr -- Triplex or Treble

Books and Periodicals
CMM -- Corpus Mensurabilis Musicae, American Institute of Musicology

JAMS -- Journal of the American Musicological Society
MB -- Musica Britannica, Royal Musical Association
RISM -- Repertoire Internationale des Sources Musicales, Section B. (G.Reaney, Manuscripts of Polyphonic Music, 11th-early 14th century, (1966))
RMARC -- Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle

British Library Catalogues
Further information of the contents of manuscripts etc. is available asfollows:

(a) for all materialacquired before 1908, except category (b) below:
A. Hughes-Hughes. A Catalogue of the Manuscript Music in the BritishMuseum, 3 vols, London, British Museum, 1906-1909, reprinted 1964-1966.

(b) for allmanuscripts with classmark RM:
W. Barclay Square and H. Andrews, Catalogue of the Kings Music Library,3 vols, London, British Museum, 1927-1929.

(c) for manuscriptsetc. acquired or identified since 1908:
P. Willetts, Handlist of Music Manuscripts Acquired 1908-1967,London, British Library, 1970.

Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts in the BritishMuseum, London, British Museum/British Library:

 

1900-1905 (Add.36298-37232, Eg. 2827-62), 1907;
1906-1910 (Add.37233-38091, Eg. 2862-89), 1912;
1911-1915 (Add.38092-39255, Eg. 2890-2909), 1925;
1916-1920 (Add.39256-40015, Eg. 2910-3030), 1933;
1921-1925 (Add.40016-41295, Eg. 3031-8), 1950;
1926-1930 (Add.41296-42181, Eg. 3039-3048), 1959;
1931-1935 (Add.42182-42864 and 43039-44085, Eg. 3049-3135), 1967;
1936-1945 (Add.44836-46172, Eg. 3136-3319), 2 vols, 1970;
1946-1950 (Add.46173-47458, Eg. 3320-3675), 1979;
1951-1955 (Add.47459-48988, Eg. 3676-3724), 1982.

Rough Register of Acquisitions of the Department ofManuscripts, British Library, London, List and Index Society, SpecialSeries:

 

Vol. 7 (1961-1965), 1974;
Vol. 8 (1966-1970), 1975;
Vol. 10 (1971-1975), 1977;
Vol. 15 (1976-1980), 1983.

 

Thanks are due to Rosalie Warburton for her patience andtolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

Roger Bray

 

General Preface -Parts Three-Five: English Music Manuscripts, c.1640-1714, Sections A and B; andThe Chapel Royal Part-Books in the British Library Royal Music Collection,c.1670-1850

 

Harvester Microfilm are proud to continue their publicationof the music manuscript collection in the British Library. This rich collectionis so large that it has been divided into broad areas. Already published in twosections are Polyphonic Music Manuscripts before about 1640, Section Aappearing in Part One and Section B in Part Two. This guide covers Parts Threeto Five. Parts Three and Four contain English music manuscripts from about1640-1714, divided into two sections with Section A appearing in Part Three andSection B in Part Four. Part Five consists of a series of part-books ofservices and anthems, formerly in the Chapel Royal, and dating from around1670-1850. The guide gives a detailed listing of manuscripts and part-books, aswell as the contents of each reel in Parts Three, Four and Five. An index ofnames and composers appears at the end. The series is under the editorialdirection of Professor Roger Bray of the University of Lancaster.

 

Parts Three and Four of this Fourth Series includemanuscripts reflecting the various styles, influences and music of theCommonwealth Restoration and late Stuart periods. All the major composers ofthe time are included - Henry Purcell, Humfrey, Blow, Byrd, Child, Lawes,Locke, C. Gibbons, O. Gibbons, and many others. Part Five consists of thepart-books of the Chapel Royal, a privileged group of clergy and musiciansunder the patronage of successive sovereigns from the early twelfth century,and dedicated to the performing of religious works. Amongst the major composersin this part are Blow, Handel, Greene, Boyce, Humfrey and Purcell.

 

The Hughes-Hughes three volume Catalogue of Manuscriptsin the British Library, almost out of print, has been reproduced on thefirst reel of Part One as an aid to users.

 

Under the watchful eye of Roger Bray, we must againacknowledge the care, attention and skill of Mavis Thomas at all stages in thepreparation of this Listing and Guide. We must also thank the British Libraryfor all the help and encouragement they have given.

 

Introduction - PartsThree-Five

 

In my Introduction to the booklet accompanying and listingthe manuscripts of music before c.1640 in the British Library, I said thatscholars would be entirely familiar with them. This is equally true of thecorpus of manuscripts now offered. In this section of our coverage we include,divided into two halves, the manuscripts of music of the British Isles coveringthe period c.1640 to c.1714 (i.e. the Commonwealth, Restoration, and lateStuart periods) and secondly, the large number of part-books from the ChapelRoyal (c.1675-c.1850). Certain editorial decisions have been made. Sourceswhich contain only music of a much earlier date have been excluded, inparticular several 18th century manuscripts containing nothing but 16th - andearly 17th century music. Similarly, manuscripts which consist largely ofContinental Music (usually Italian) have been excluded, to await a furthervisit to the archives which we hope will cover manuscripts containingexclusively Continental Music.

 

The British Librarys collection is a tribute to itsnineteenth-century librarians in particular. They seem to have acquired almosteverything of our period that seemed to be of any significance, at a time whenmanuscripts were still passing between private collectors much more frequentlythan today. The Librarys own publications (and in particular the variouscatalogues of additions) give the immediate provenance of their manuscripts,and further details of those manuscripts which have been of particular interestto scholars are found in more recent writings.

 

In this booklet I have once again attempted to summarise thecontents of each manuscript. Many of my problems with the earlier sources havefortunately disappeared, owing to the change in the nature of the music, but tosome extent they have been replaced by others, notably the need to distinguishbetween glees, catches, songs, and part-songs. At least I hope that a general indicationof the contents will be apparent. An indication of the importance of themanuscripts is the number of autograph sources. From the period up to 1714there are examples by Henry Aldrich, John Blow, Jeremiah Clarke, William Croft,John Eccles, Pelham Humfrey, George Jeffreys, John Jenkins, Henry Lawes,Matthew Locke, Daniel Purcell, Henry Purcell, Thomas Tudway, William Walond,and John Weldon, with, in addition, a manuscript partly in the hand of JohnPlayford and a series of writings by Roger North. The part-books from theChapel Royal, the section of the English Court musical establishment devoted tothe performance of sacred music, show its importance in leading the way toinnovations in performing practice and compositional technique and notablecontributions include William Boyce, Maurice Greene, John Blow, Pelham Humfreyand Henry Purcell. In this Listing and Guide I give, for each manuscript, abrief description of the contents, names of composers, and a date, followed inbrackets by a page reference to the relevant entries in Hughes-Hughesscatalogue.

 

British Library Catalogues

 

Further information of the contents of manuscripts etc. isavailable as follows:

 

(a) for all materialacquired before 1908, except category (b) below:
A. Hughes-Hughes, A Catalogue of the Manuscript Music in the BritishMuseum, 3 vols. London, British Museum, 1906-1909, reprinted 1964-1966.

(b) for allmanuscripts with the classmark RM:
W. Barlcay Squire and H. Andrews, Catalogue of the Kings Music Library,3 vols. London, British Museum, 1927-1929.

(c) for manuscriptsetc. acquired or identified since 1908:
P. Willetts, Handlist of Music Manuscripts Acquired 1908-1967, London,British Library, 1970.

Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts in the BritishMuseum, London, British Museum/British Library:

 

1900-1905 (Add.36298-37232, Eg. 2827-62), 1907;
1906-1910 (Add.37233-38091, Eg. 2862-89), 1912;
1911-1915 (Add.38092-39255, Eg. 2890-2909), 1925;
1916-1920 (Add.39256-40015, Eg. 2910-3030), 1933;
1921-1925 (Add.40016-41295, Eg. 3931-8), 1950;
1926-1930 (Add.41296-42181, Eg. 3039-3048), 1959;
1931-1935 (Add.42182-42864 and 43039-44085, Eg. 3049-3135), 1967;
1936-1945 (Add.44836-46172, Eg. 3136-3319), 2 vols, 1970;
1946-1950 (Add.46173-47458, Eg. 3320-3675), 1979;
1951-1955 (Add.47459-48988, Eg. 3676-3724), 1982.

Rough Register of Acquisitions of the Department ofManuscripts, British Library, London, List and Index Society, SpecialSeries:

 

Vol. 7 (1961-1965), 1974;
Vol. 8 (1966-1970), 1975;
Vol. 10 (1971-1975), 1977;
Vol. 15 (1976-1980), 1983.

 

Thanks are due to Rosalie Warburton for her patience andtolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

Roger Bray

 

General Preface -Parts Six-Eight: Handel Manuscripts, Section A: Operas, Serenades and Odes;Section B: Oratorios and Church Music; Section C: Instrumental Music, Cantatasand Other Music

 

1985 marks the tercentenacy of Handels birth and isEuropean Music Year. It is thus particularly fitting that Harvester shouldpublish this unrivalled collection of Handel music manuscripts from the BritishLibrary, London.

 

The collection is extensive and forms Parts 6, 7 and 8 ofour publication of The Music Manuscripts of the British Library. Parts 1 and 2of the series made available Polyphonic Music before c.1640; Parts 3 and 4covered English Music Manuscripts, c.1640-c.1714; Part 5 offers the ChapelRoyal Part-Books, c.1670-c.1850; and the series continues.

 

The series is under the editorial direction of ProfessorRoger Bray of the University of Lancaster. To aid users, Professor Bray hasarranged the Handel manuscripts broadly by genre. Part 6 covers Operas,Serenades and Odes. Part 7 covers Oratorios and Church Music. Part 8 coversInstrumental Music, Cantatas, and manuscripts of mixed contents.

 

This guide provides a complete list of the manuscriptsappearing on each reel and in Parts 6, 7 and 8. Added to this is a consolidatedindex of works by Handel, and an index of the other composers featured in themanuscripts (including Albinoni, Blow, Scarlatti and Vivaldi).

 

Once again we must acknowledge the care, attention and skillof Mavis Thomas at all stages of this listing and guide. We must also thank theBritish Library for all the help and encouragement they have given.

 

Introduction - PartsSix-Eight

 

Handels collection of his own autograph copies of his worksforms the basis of the collection held in the British Library. Handelbequeathed them to his amanuensis J.C. Smith, who presented them in the 1760sor 1770s to George III. George V placed them on permanent loan in the BritishMuseum in 1911, and they now belong to the British Library, where they arehoused in the Music Room. The former Royal collection also contains a verylarge number of fair copies, which also come from Handels own collection. Theholdings of the British Library also include several manuscripts (including afew autographs) in the Department of MSS.

 

As a result, the British Library can boast the mostcomprehensive coverage of Handel MSS. The range of Handel autographs is nearlycomplete. The number of major works which do not appear in autograph in thiscollection may be counted on the fingers of one hand (and in two such casesthere is no surviving autograph copy in any case).

 

I have organised the MSS into three groups: Operas,Serenades and Odes; Oratorios and Church Music; and finally Instrumental Music,Cantatas and other music. In addition I have placed in the third section (withthe instrumental music) those MSS which contain several works and which crossthe boundaries I have defined above. In many cases, where I have listed thecontents of a MS as extracts from a particular work, this actually indicatesadditional music for a revival of the work.

 

Fortunately, a great deal of work has been done on describingHandel manuscripts. In addition to the British Library Catalogues listed below,the catalogue of Handels works by W.C. Smith (in Handel: A Symposium,ed. G. Abraham (London, 1954)) will be found to be particularly useful.

 

After each entry in this listing, where appropriate, areference has been given to either the Barclay Squire Catalogue of the KingsMusic Library or the Hughes-Hughes Catalogue of the Manuscript Music.References to KML are therefore to Vol. 1 of the three-volume Barclay Squireset listed below. Other references, covering mainly Additional and Egerton MSS,are to the appropriate place in the Hughes-Hughes three-volume set.

 

Thanks are again due to Rosalie Warburton for her patienceand tolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

British Library Catalogues

 

Further information of the contents of manuscripts etc. isavailable as follows:

 

(a) for all materialacquired before 1908, except category (b) below:
A. Hughes-Hughes, A Catalogue of the Manuscript Music in the BritishMuseum, 3 vols. London, British Museum, 1906-1909, reprinted 1964-1966.

(b) for allmanuscripts with the classmark RM:
W. Barclay Squire and H. Andrews, Catalogue of the Kings Music Library,3 vols, London, British Museum, 1927-1929.

(c) for manuscriptsetc. acquired or identified since 1908:
P. Willetts, Handlist of Music Manuscripts Acquired 1908-1967, London,British Library, 1970.

Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts in the BritishMuseum, London, British Museum/British Library:

 

1900-1905 (Add.36298-37232, Eg. 2827-62), 1907;
1906-1910 (Add.37233-38091, Eg. 2862-89), 1912;
1911-1915 (Add.38092-39255, Eg. 2890-2909), 1925;
1916-1920 (Add.39256-40015, Eg. 2910-3030), 1933;
1921-1925 (Add.40016-41295, Eg. 3031-3038), 1950;
1926-1930 (Add.41296-42181, Eg. 3039-3048), 1959;
1931-1935 (Add.42182-42864 and 43039-44085, Eg. 3049-3135), 1967;
1936-1945 (Add.44836-46172, Eg. 3136-3319), 2 vols, 1970;
1946-1950 (Add.46173-47458, Eg. 3320-3675), 1979;
1951-1955 (Add.47459-48988, Eg. 3676-3724), 1982.

Rough Register of Acquisitions of the Department ofManuscripts, British Library, London, List and Index Society, SpecialSeries:

 

Vol. 7 (1961-1965), 1974;
Vol. 8 (1966-1970), 1975;
Vol. 10 (1971-1975), 1977;
Vol. 15 (1976-1980), 1983.

Roger Bray
University of Lancaster

General Preface -Parts Nine and Ten: English Music Manuscripts, c.1714-1810, Sections A and B

 

Harvester Microform are proud to continue their publicationof music manuscript collections with Parts 9 and 10 of Series Four, The MusicManuscript Collection of the British Library, London.

 

Parts One and Two of Series Four contain Polyphonic Musicfrom before c.1640. Parts Three and Four contain English Music Manuscriptsc.1640-1714, Part Five consists of the Chapel Royal Part-books, c.1670-1850,and Parts Six, Seven and Eight contain the wealth of Handel Manuscripts in theBritish Library.

 

Parts Nine and Ten of this magnificent collection containmusic by Handels contemporaries and successors in England, c.1714-c.1810.Opera, instrumental chamber music, and sacred and secular vocal music areparticularly well represented, including works by Arne, Boyce, Crotch and S.Wesley in autograph scores.

 

The Hughes-Hughes three volume Catalogue of Manuscriptsin the British Museum, almost out of print, has been reproduced on thefirst reel of Part One as an aid to users.

 

Under the watchful eye of Roger Bray, we must againacknowledge the care, attention and skill of Mavis Thomas at all stages in thepreparation of this Listing and Guide. We must also thank the British Libraryfor all the help and encouragement they have given.

 

Introduction - PartsNine and Ten

 

The British Librarys holdings of eighteenth century musicare so extensive that they have been divided into several sections. The periodhas already been introduced by Parts Three and Four, which include material upto about 1714, by Part Five, the series of Chapel Royal Part-books running fromaround 1670-1850, and by the major collection of Handel manuscripts publishedas Parts Six, Seven and Eight.

 

In eighteenth century England the qualities andindividuality of composers such as Locke, Blow and Purcell were largelysubsumed by the influence of Handel and his Italianate successors. By way ofcomparison with the present programme of music by indigenous composers, we willbe filming from the holdings of the British Library a sequence of music byItalian and Italianate composers besides Handel, including M.A. and G.B.Bononcini, Durante and J.C. Bach. These composers are represented in thepresent group of sources as well, but our main focus here is on their Englishcontemporaries up to about 1810.

 

Very little of this music is available in modern editions.This publication provides a rare opportunity for scholars to reassess the balancebetween English music and Continental influences in the eighteenth century.Many students and lovers of English music of this period will have noreservations about the quality of the music, and will be interested to findworks for unfamiliar mediums by some composers. These include an oratorio byJohn Stanley, a St. Cecilia Ode by Samuel Wesley, organ music by Samuel Webbesenior, and an Ode by John Worgan. All the Georgian composers are represented,many of them in autograph.

 

Within this group of manuscripts there are several smallerseries presenting various repertoires. One example is the large collection ofmanuscripts by Samuel Wesley. Besides being a fine composer in his own right,as one of the first champions in England of the music of J.S. Bach, and as thefather of S.S. Wesley, his influence has been felt into the nineteenth centuryand beyond. All features of his music are covered in these manuscripts, whichare mostly in his own hand.

 

Another important group of sources covers dramatic music,some of it particularly associated with the pleasure gardens such as theVauxhall Gardens, much in fashion at the time, and glees and catches whichreflect the repertoire of the gentlemens catch clubs which were also popularand fashionable at the time.

 

Of some interest as a curiosity is Wordsworths musiccommonplace book, and we also find eighteen symphonies by the astronomer SirWilliam Herschel. There are several manuscripts with a pupil/teacher interest,including copies of music by Greene in the hands of pupils Stanley, Boyce andPhilip Hayes; music by J.S. Bach copied presumably for didactic reasons amongstothers by Samuel Wesley (although after Bachs death, of course); music byPurcell copied by Blow (although the relationship is more one of healthy mutualrespect than any suggestion that the older Blow was a pupil of Purcells); andthere are two curious examples of teachers corrections and annotations, ofAttwoods music corrected by his teacher Mozart, and of J.W. Callcotts musicwith annotations thought to be in the hand of his teacher Haydn.

 

There is autograph material by C.F. Abel (sonatas for theviola da gamba), Arne (including his oratorio Judith), Boyce (includinghis Trio Sonatas), Callcott (see above), Clementi (sketches), Benjamin Cooke,Croft, Crotch (including two oratorios), Dibdin, Dupuis, Greene, P. Hayes,Hook, W. Linley, Nares, Shield, J.C. Smith (an opera Issipile apparentlycomposed by Handels amanuensis), Stevens, Travers, Walond, Samuel, Webbe(senior and junior), S. Wesley (see above), and the documents by Burney andHawkins mentioned above. Such a wealth of authoritative material is ofinestimable value in studying the music of the period.

 

In this Guide I have, as usual, attempted to mention foreach manuscript all significant genres and all contributing composers.References at the end of manuscript descriptions (up to Add.37522) refer to theHughes-Hughes catalogue (see below). Thanks are again due to Rosalie Warburtonfor keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

British Library Catalogues

 

Further information of the contents of manuscripts etc. isavailable as follows:

 

(a) for all materialacquired before 1908, except category (b) below:
A. Hughes-Hughes, A Catalogue of the Manuscript Music in the British Museum,3 vols, London, British Museum, 1906-1909, reprinted 1964-1966.

(b) for allmanuscripts with the classmark RM:
W. Barclay Squire and H. Andrews, Catalogue of the Kings Music Library,3 vols, London, British Museum, 1927-1929.

(c) for manuscriptsetc. acquired or identified since 1908:
P. Willetts, Handlist of Music Manuscripts Acquired 1908-1967, London,British Library, 1970.

Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts in the BritishMuseum, London, British Museum/British Library:

 

1900-1905 (Add.36298-37232, Eg. 2827-61), 1907;
1906-1910 (Add.37233-38091, Eg. 2862-89), 1812;
1911-1915 (Add.38092-39255, Eg. 2890-2909), 1925;
1916-1920 (Add.39256-40015, Eg. 2910-3030), 1933;
1921-1925 (Add.40016-41295, Eg. 3031-3038), 1950;
1926-1930 (Add.41296-42181, Eg. 3039-3048), 1959;
1931-1935 (Add.42182-42864 and 43039-44085, Eg. 3049-3135), 1967;
1936-1945 (Add.44836-46172, Eg. 3136-3319), 2 vols, 1970;
1946-1950 (Add.46173-47458, Eg. 3320-3675), 1979;
1951-1955 (Add.47459-48988, Eg. 3676-3724), 1982.

Rough Register of Acquisitions of the Department ofManuscripts, British Library, London, List and Index Society, SpecialSeries:

 

Vol. 7 (1961-1965), 1974;
Vol. 8 (1966-1970), 1975;
Vol. 10 (1971-1975), 1977;
Vol. 15 (1976-1980), 1983.

Roger Bray
University of Lancaster