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Music Manuscripts: Series 5: Part 2: Royal College of Music, London: Section B: English Manuscripts before c.1800


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About this Collection

Music Mss from the Great English Collections: Series V Royal College ofMusic

Introduction: MusicManuscripts from the Great English Collections: Series 5: The Music Collectionof the Royal College of Music, London: Parts One-Nine

 

General Preface -Parts One and Two: English Music Manuscripts before c.1800: Sections A and B

 

Harvester Microform (now Primary Source Microfilm, animprint of Thomson/Gale) are proud to continue their series of music manuscriptcollections with that of the Royal College of Music, London. The immense wealthof this collection is being made available for the first time and has beendivided up into broad areas. Initially we are concentrating on English Musicbefore c.1800, and this will be published in two sections, Section A appearingin Part One and Section B in Part Two. This Guide gives a detailed listing ofmanuscripts as well as the contents of each reel in Parts One and Two. An Indexof names and composers appears at the end. The series is under the editorialdirection of Professor Roger Bray of the University of Lancaster.

 

Series One in the Harvester collection of music manuscriptcollections is based on that of the Bodleian Library, Oxford; Series Twocontains the magnificent collection of St. Michaels College, Tenbury, alsohoused at the Bodleian Library; Series Three is the extensive music collectionof Christ Church, Oxford; and Series Four makes available the collection of theBritish Library, London.

 

Parts One and Two of this Fifth Series consists of Englishmusic and manuscripts associated with England from the Tudor to the Georgianperiods and includes important sources by Jenkins, Locke, Simpson, Purcell andall the other major composers of the period.

 

The Royal College of Music unpublished typescript catalogueof manuscripts originally prepared by William Barclay Square and subsequentlyamended and annotated by Rupert Erlebach, has been reproduced on the first reelas an aid to users, and the relevant sections of the catalogue are reproducedagain at the beginning of each reel.

 

Under the watchful eye of Roger Bray we must againacknowledge the care and attention of Mavis Thomas at all stages in thepreparation of this Listing and Guide.

 

Introduction - PartsOne and Two: English Music Manuscripts before c.1800: Sections A and B

 

The collection of manuscripts of the Royal College of Music,London, has long been recognised for its quality, and is particularly importantfor its holdings in English Music. The major portion of the Original collectionwas purchased from the Sacred Harmonic Society in 1883, and a substantialamount was added when the Library of the Concerts of Ancient Music waspresented to the College by Queen Victoria. More recent additions havereflected the particular associations with the College of people such as Grove,Parry, Stanford, Dyson, Coleridge, Taylor, etc. In this first part of ourfilming, we include all manuscripts containing English Music before c.1800,together with those printed books which include manuscript additions. Sincemost of these latter sources are themselves musical, and contain the same typeof music as their manuscript additions, we have, where appropriate, includedthe printed material as well. In the Colleges collection there are a largenumber of very important sources, including holographs by John Alcock, ThomasArne, Samuel Arnold, John Blow, William Boyce, Benjamin Cooke, William Croft,Maurice Greene, J. Hook, George Jeffreys, Matthew Locke, John Travers, ThomasTudway, John Weldon, and possibly also John Eccles and Daniel Purcell. Thereare also manuscripts in the hand of John Barnard (his own anthology whichformed the basis of his First Book of Selected Church Music of 1641,which is itself in the collection in part, with manuscript additions, andtherefore included), Thomas Hamond, Philip Hayes, John Playford, and J.C.Smith. As for the music contained in these manuscripts, a glance at the Indexwill show that there is hardly a single English composer of any eminence fromc.1550 to c.1800 whose music does not appear.

 

In this booklet I have attempted to provide a brief summaryof the contents of each manuscript, using the excellent Catalogue prepared in1926 by W. Barclay Squire (with revisions and additions) which is reproducedcomplete on reel one. The catalogue has never been published, and so it is tobe hoped that its appearance on film will itself be useful to scholars of thisperiod. It is in typescript with handwritten additions covering both recentarrivals and recent descriptions, identifications, etc. and the CollegeLibrarians policy of collecting information provided by scholars is to beapplauded.

 

In this booklet I give, for each manuscript, a briefdescription of the contents, together with the names of all identifiedcomposers included therein, and a date. For details of abbreviations, seebelow. Composers names have been standardised generally according to TheNew Grove.

 

Abbreviations

 

A -- Altus or Alto
B -- Bassus or Bass
C -- Cantus
Ct -- Countertenor
M -- Medius
Q -- Quintus
S -- Soprano
Sx -- Sextus
T -- Tenor
Tr -- Treble

Thanks are again due to Rosalie Warburton for her patienceand tolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

Roger Bray
University of Lancaster

 

General Preface -Parts Three-Six: Continental Music Manuscripts before 1850: Sections A, B, Cand D

 

Harvester Microform are proud to continue their series ofmusic manuscript collections with that of the Royal College of Music, London.The immense wealth of this collection is being made available for the firsttime and has been divided up into broad areas.

 

Already published are Parts One and Two, consisting ofSections A and B of English Music manuscripts before c.1800. The second broadtheme concentrates on Continental Music before c.1850. This will be publishedin four sections, Section A appearing in Part Three, Section B in Part Four,Section C in Part Five, and Section D in Part Six. This Guide gives a detailedlisting of manuscripts as well as the contents of each reel in Parts Three,Four, Five, and Six. An Index of names and composers appears at the end. Theseries is under the editorial direction of Professor Roger Bray of theUniversity of Lancaster.

 

The Continental Music manuscripts in Parts Three to Six ofthis Fifth Series include important sources by Bach, Haydn, Jommelli, Orlandi,Pergolesi, Rossi, Scarlatti, Schweizer and many others. In fact there is hardlya single important Continental composer from this period unrepresented in thecollection.

 

The Royal College of Music unpublished typescript catalogueof manuscripts originally prepared by William Barclay Squire and subsequentlyamended and annotated by Rupert Erlebach has been reproduced on the first reelof Part One as an aid to users, and the relevant sections of the catalogue arereproduced again at the beginning of each reel.

 

Under the watchful eye of Roger Bray we must againacknowledge the care and attention of Mavis Thomas at all stages in thepreparation of this Listing and Guide.

 

Introduction - PartsThree-Six: Continental Music Manuscripts before 1850: Sections A, B, C and D

 

In addition to the important holdings of English Music inthe Collection of the Royal College of Music there is a great amount ofContinental material, mostly Italian, and it is to this that we turn in thispart of our filming from this library. The major portion of the original collectionwas purchased from the Sacred Harmonic Society in 1883, and a substantialamount was added when the Library of the Concerts of Ancient Music waspresented to the College by Queen Victoria. More recent additions havereflected the particular associations with the College of people such as Grove,Parry, Stanford, Dyson, Coleridge-Taylor etc.

 

The earliest manuscripts included in this part are MSS.1070, 2037 and 2075, which transmit French, Flemish and Italian music of theearly sixteenth century, including such composers as Josquin, Mouton, Brumel,Compere, Obrecht, Porta, Vaet, de Wert and Willaert. There is a very largecorpus of Italian music, sacred and secular, of the late 17th and 18thcenturies which appears in this part of our microfilm series. Included areautograph scores by J.C. Bach, Bianchi, Clari, Durante, Ferrari, Fioravanti,Pasquali, Perez, Piccinni and Alessandro Scarlatti. There is also a smallamount of slightly later music, including Mozarts autograph copy of his PianoConcerto K. 491, Haydns autograph copy of his opera Armida, a song inautograph by Beethoven, likewise one by Schumann, an autograph copy by Chopinof one of his waltzes (Op. 69 No. 1), Joachims autograph copy of his Cadenzafor Beethovens Violin Concerto, and finally the famous sketches for a symphonyby Schubert.

 

The College also possesses a set of performing books (MSS704-719) containing much dramatic and operatic music apparently used at theKings Theatre, London, from 1790-1815 (including sections in the hand ofHaydn). The links with the College mentioned above are seen in the autographSchumann song Manuscript (MS 4813), which has an inscription to Sir GeorgeGrove by Clara Schumann, and in the Haydn Partita manuscript (MS 4117)which, according to the Catalogue, includes information relating to Haydnsclavichord now in the possession of the College.

 

In this booklet I have attempted to provide a brief summaryof the contents of each manuscript, using the excellent Catalogue prepared in1926 by W. Barclay Squire (with revisions and additions) which is reproducedcomplete on reel one of Part One. This Catalogue has never been published andits appearance on film will itself be useful to scholars of this period. It isin typescript with handwritten additions covering both recent arrivals andrecent descriptions and identifications.

 

In this booklet, I give, for each manuscript, a briefdescription of the contents, together with the names of all identifiedcomposers included therein, and a date. Composers names have been standardisedgenerally according to The New Grove.

 

Thanks are again due to Rosalie Warburton for her patienceand tolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of the operation working smoothly.

 

Roger Bray
University of Lancaster

 

General Preface -Parts Seven-Nine: English Music Manuscripts, c.1800-1870: Sections A and B

 

Harvester Microform now completes coverage of the MusicCollection of the Royal College of Music, London.

 

The Collection is available in a total of nine parts and hasbeen divided into broad themes to aid users.

 

Parts One and Two cover English Music before c.1800. PartsThree, Four, Five and Six present continental music manuscripts from Josquinand Brumel in the early sixteenth century, to Mozart and Beethoven at the endof the eighteenth century. Separate guides are available covering these parts.

 

This Guide covers Parts Seven, Eight and Nine. Parts Sevenand Eight are devoted to English Music Manuscripts c.1800-c.1870 and includesmuch material formerly held by the Sacred Harmonic Society and the Concerts ofAncient Music. Part Nine offers English Music Manuscripts c.1870-c.1930, andfeatures numerous works in the autograph of Sullivan, Coleridge-Taylor, Holst,Stanford, MacCunn, Parry, Elgar and Wood.

 

The Guide provides a detailed listing of the manuscripts,indicating the contents of reels of all three parts. A Complete Index of Namesand Composers in Part Seven, Eight and Nine appears at the end.

 

Users are also referred to the unpublished typescriptcatalogue of the Royal College of Music Collection by William Barclay Square -amended and annotated by Rupert Erlebach. This appears in full on reel one ofPart One of this programme. The relevant sections are also included on eachreel.

 

The programme has been prepared by the Series Editor,Professor Roger Bray of the University of Lancaster. Acknowledgement and thanksare also due to Mavis Thomas, who has been involved at all stages in thepreparation of this Listing and Guide, and to the Royal College of Music fortheir help and encouragement.

 

This Guide also provides a Complete Index of Names andComposers in Parts 1-9. Also included, and especially prepared for this Guide,is a Complete Index of Manuscripts in all nine parts which gives the reelnumber and part number for easy location of each manuscript.

 

Introduction - PartsSeven-Nine: English Music Manuscripts, c.1800-1870: Sections A and B

 

In this selection of manuscripts in the possession of theRoyal College of Music we draw heavily upon the libraries originally collectedby the Sacred Harmonic Society and the Concerts of Ancient Music. The formerwas Londons chief choral society between 1832 and 1889, with its performancesat Exeter Hall in the Strand until 1880 and in St. Jamess Hall, Regent Streetthereafter. Its library was purchased in 1883 when the College was established.The Concerts of Ancient Music were among the most prestigious subscriptionseries between 1776 and 1849, under Royal and noble patronage, and apparentlythe patrons (e.g. George III, Albert Prince Consort, the Duke of Wellington)selected the programmes, with a rule that music less than twenty years old wasnot allowed. The performances took place in the Hanover Square Rooms, from1804. The library passed to Queen Victoria, as patron, and she presented it tothe College. We now offer the MSS of English music from these collections,having included the large number of MSS of mainly Italian music in Parts 3, 4,5 and 6.

 

Parts 7 and 8 focus on the years 1800-1870. The work ofHenry Bishop figures largely in this period, and we include several operas andother dramatic works written for the popular theatres of the day (e.g. theTheatre Royal, Drury Lane, and the Vauxhall Gardens) as well as the 19 volumesof his arrangements made for the Concerts of Ancient Music. Bishop, clearly oneof the most important figures of the first half of the 19th century in England,was Professor of Music at Edinburgh and later (1848-1854) Oxford, where hefollowed Crotch (who had been Professor for 51 years) and preceded Ouseley (whowas to be for 35 years), and appears to have been influential in determiningthe direction taken by English music from c.1810. For this reason alone hismusic is worthy of study, but it is equally interesting to observe the taste ofthe period, as shown in the music which he arranged to suit popular demand, andby the two libraries of performing copies mentioned above.

 

The College also possesses several MSS formerly in thecollection of J.W. Windsor, who was organist of St. Margarets Chapel, Bath,and a great collector of music, secular as well as sacred, of the period. Theassociation with Bath is of interest, since this was another fashionable centreat the time, and we include one MS (725) associated with the Theatre Royal,Bath.

 

In Part 9 we include the very extensive collection ofautograph MSS built up by the College itself and which features composersassociated with it during the early part of the century, namely Sullivan,MacCunn, Coleridge Taylor, Parry, Stanford, Wood, Holst, Elgar.

 

Notable autographs includeSullivans Yeoman of the Guard and The Golden Legend; HamishMacCunns Lay of the Last Minstrel, and Jeanie Dean; ColeridgeTaylors Symphony in A minor (last movement), Kubla Khan, TheAtonement, The Song of Hiawatha (extracts); Parrys Third and FourthSymphonies (including both the 1889 and 1910 versions of the Fourth), his PianoConcerto in F sharp (including also an arrangement for two pianofortes), Judith,Ode on the Nativity, his Nonet, Symphonic Fantasia, Symphonic Variationsin E minor, various suites of incidental music overtures, The Pied Piper ofHamelin, The Lotus Eaters, Ode to Music, King Saul,his Coronation Te Deum of 1911, I was glad, the string quintet, Jerusalem(Parrys original full score, and Elgars orchestration); Stanfords Songsof the Sea, The Travelling Companion, The Critic, Songs ofthe Fleet, Requiem, Eden, his cantatas The Resurrection,Ode to Discord, and The Battle of the Baltic, his Irish Dances,The Three Holy Children, several suites of incidental music, his 8thstring quartet, The Canterbury Pilgrims, Sechs Lieder von Heine,his Second and Third Irish Rhapsodies, and several songs; Holsts First ChoralSymphony, The Perfect Fool (his original pianoforte version andsketches), Somerset Rhapsody, Brook Green, his HammersmithSuite, and various movements from his Planets suite in the version(partly in autograph) for pianoforte duet; and Elgars cello concerto.

 

In this booklet I have attemptedto provide a brief summary of the contents of each manuscript, using theexcellent Catalogue prepared in 1926 by W. Barclay Squire (with revisions andadditions) which is reproduced complete on reel one of Part One. This Cataloguehas never been published and its appearance on film will itself be useful toscholars of this period. It is in typescript with handwritten additionscovering both recent arrivals and recent descriptions and identifications.

 

Thanks are again due to RosalieWarburton for her patience and tolerance in keeping the Lancaster end of theoperation working smoothly.

 

Roger Bray, University ofLancaster, November 1985