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Princeton University Libraries Latin American Microfilm Collection: Supplements I-V


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About this Collection

Introduction: Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection

Introduction: Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection

 

Thereexists a diverse and extensively written record concerning virtually allaspects of Latin American society over the last 150 years. Because many ofthese publications have found their way into research libraries, today it ispossible to study various dimensions of Latin America using the books,newspapers, journals, pamphlets, and posters of the period in addition tosecondary sources. Even so, a comprehensive collection of publications withresearch value continues to prove to be an elusive goal because of thecomplexities of Latin American societies, changing governments, unstableeconomies, turbulent political life, and social inequities that affectsignificant proportions of the population of most countries. Furthermore, muchof the documentation that is readily available to libraries emanates from thosepublic or private sector organizations that compile and distribute publicationsadvancing particular perspectives or arguments representative of groups inpower.

 

Scholarshave long recognized that not all voices important to understanding LatinAmerica are readily accessible in research library collections because ofacquisition difficulties, collection development policies, processing costs,and preservation considerations. Such constraints do not diminish the worth ofthe information but rather highlight the fact that relatively few libraries arein a position to collect consistently the documentation from marginalizedgroups, political opposition forces in countries that are not democraticallyruled, and various nonmainstream organizations devoted to a wide range ofsocioeconomic and cultural activities at local and regional levels. Suchprimary sources, as well as specialized government publications, when combinedwith secondary sources such as working papers from research institutes,constitute an invaluable source of documentation for future study. Towardmeeting current and future research needs, the Princeton University Librarieshave endeavored to acquire, on a selected basis, those publications thatprovide access to perspectives on and information from such groups involvedwith different aspects of Latin American life.

 

Content

 

Thematerials microfilmed represent a major proportion of Princetons collectionsof ephemera: mostly pamphlets, noncommercially produced and distributedserials, working papers of research institutes, fliers, some posters, andgovernment publications. Emphasized throughout are those publications providingsubstantive content with only samples of documentation containing limitedinformation. Such publications are useful in that they provide a direct andoften intimate insight into a particular historic moment, such as a politicalparty campaign or a strike. Depending on the content and issuing agencies,serial publications are included either because of a titles particularimportance for documenting a situation or as a sampling within that subjectarea. Posters are included in the collection primarily for the information theyconvey and only occasionally for solely aesthetic value. Governmentpublications are usually the type intended to convey procedures (e.g., forelections), present or evaluate government plans that deal primarily with abroad range of development issues, report on the activities of particularagencies within a ministry, and address topics of importance to foreignrelations (e.g., speeches and declarations).

 

Workingpapers from research institutes and activist groups constitute an importantbody of data representing scholarly thought through microlevel studies. In manycases, these publications are the only works that address topics with scarce ornonexistent primary sources. Particularly in the areas of gender studies andrace issues, working papers draw extensively from interviews and relatedfieldwork. In instances of military or other forms of nondemocratic rule,research organizations often are the only truly independent scholarly bodiespermitted to write and publish without censorship. Under these circumstances,working papers become valuable critiques of contemporary events as well asreflective essays on the relevant political, social, and economic issues.

 

Selection

 

Amid asubstantial variety of publications, selection has emphasized substantive worksthat also reflect the needs and interests of potential readers. As resourcespermitted, every attempt was made to include as many perspectives on an issueas possible. Special attention to the voz popular ensures the presence ofworks written by, or for, those at the margins of economic, political, andsocial power (e.g., women residents of squatter settlements, guerrillas). Asappropriate, such perspectives are balanced by the inclusion of availablegovernment and other official agencies publications, and by studies fromresearch institutes.

 

ThroughoutLatin America, and particularly in Chile, the issuing of many publications bygroups operating extralegally or clandestinely has proven a risky business.Such movements have detailed agendas or general plans extending overconsiderable time periods, thereby allowing the study and analysis of theirideology and actions. Of particular interest is the transition of legal statusoccurring as part of a redemocratization process. Considerable coverage forPeru, Chile, and Brazil documents the rise of political parties as the militarywithdraws from government. Such publications reveal the vibrancy of discussionby the citizenry, whether they are residents of squatter settlements, membersof ecclesiastic base communities, or activists in environmental, womens, orethnic groups.

 

In suchvaried subject areas as youth, women, environment, and agrarian issues,official documents give the governments position. When presented at the nationallevel amid topics of greater concern, official statements often are accordedinsignificant space and attention, thereby making the topically focusedpublications representing these agencies points of view all the moreimportant. For socioeconomic topics, collecting emphasis is on developmentissues ranging from feasibility studies to evaluations. A limited number ofreports of a restricted circulation nature from multinational lending agenciesare also included.

 

Thecountries best represented are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Cuba, withemphasis on materials that document socioeconomic and political conditions.Often, extensive coverage exists for the different points of view advocated byinterest groups and, in the case of Cuba, by the government. For the timeperiod represented for each topical group of materials, researchers will findpublications in substantial quantity that address different levels of readers,Such a panorama of perspectives and consideration of different potentialaudiences make the complete country collections particularly rewarding forthose seeking inclusiveness. More narrowly defined coverage is present forPeru, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Uruguay, where emphasis is on fewer topics butstill with substantial representation of the interest groups writing fordifferent levels of readers. For the remaining Latin American countries overallcoverage is not comprehensive but rather has emphasized particular topics orperiods.

 

Organization

 

Thecollection is organized by country with ten broad topical groups: 1. Politics;2. Government; 3. Socioeconomic conditions; 4. Agriculture; 5. Constitutions,laws, and codes; 6. Human and civil rights; 7. Racial groups; 8. Women andgender issues; 9. Culture; 10. Church and religion.

 

Not allcountries have publications from each of these groups. Materials are filmedaccording to either group or time period. Occasionally some microfilming wasdone with what was available rather than waiting until absolutely every issueof a serial was obtained or more years of coverage for a particular groupspublications were available. Therefore, it is sometimes necessary to consultvarious rolls to see full coverage for a particular country. This is especiallytrue for the Chilean efforts to remove democratically military rule.

 

Arrangementon each roll is chronological, with the oldest documents first and the undatedones at the end. Posters are generally filmed last. All issues of a serial aregrouped by title and appear amid other formats of materials within thechronological scheme of organization. Occasionally a single serial titleconstitutes an entire roll; in such cases, holdings information appears in thefirst few frames.

 

Bibliographic Access

 

Bibliographicaccess reflects the electronic environments present in most research librariestoday. Each microfilm title has an RLIN (Research Libraries InformationNetwork) identification number, which is searchable within the RLINcomputerized database; searches are possible by the title as well. With theexception of a few serial titles, all of the titles in the collection alsoappear on OCLC (On-line Computer Library Center). The catalog record for eachtitle includes the subject headings; an extensive listing of corporate bodyadded entries; and, for major publications within each group, author and titleentries. Records for serials include itemized holdings. Hence, for many rollsseveral dozen or more access points exist. For particularly large collections,stress is on corporate bodies rather than on citations of individual works,since it is assumed that researchers will benefit most by being able to reviewthe entire body of documentation of a particular group. Serial publicationswith very limited runs that fall within the topical grouping appear on the sameroll with individual titles and holdings usually cited.

 

The Guide,organized by country and therein by title of the collection filmed, providesthe RLIN identification number and Princeton Universitys Film M number. Asubject approach by topical groups is as follows:

 

Group 1 - Politics:
Current events
Campaigns
Elections
Parties
Guerrillas, clandestine opposition

 

Group 2 - Government:
Public policy
Official documents and propaganda
Foreign relations

 

Group 3 - Socioeconomic conditions:
Economic development
Labor
Education
Transportation
Health and demography
Communications and media

 

Group 4 - Agriculture:
Agrarian reform
Labor

 

Group 5 - Constitutions, laws, andcodes

 

Group 6 - Human and civil rights

 

Group 7 - Racial groups:
Blacks, Indians

 

Group 8 - Women and gender issues

 

Group 9 Culture

 

Group 10 - Church and religion:
Catholic, Protestants, Jews

 

Each titlealso has a country code:

 

Number 01:Argentina

 

Number 02:Bolivia

 

Number 03:Brazil

 

Number 04:Canary Islands

 

Number 05:Central America/Panama

 

Number 06:Chile

 

Number 07:Colombia

 

Number 08:Costa Rica

 

Number 09:Cuba

 

Number 10:Ecuador

 

Number 11:El Salvador

 

Number 12:Guadeloupe

 

Number 13:Guatemala

 

Number 14:Haiti

 

Number 15:Honduras

 

Number 16:Latin America

 

Number 17:Mexico

 

Number 18:Nicaragua

 

Number 19:Panama

 

Number 20:Paraguay

 

Number 21:Peru

 

Number 22:Puerto Rico

 

Number 24:Uruguay

 

Number 25:Venezuela

 

Number 26:West Indies

 

 

Introduction: Supplements

 

Extensivewritten records document a wide panorama of Latin American society over thelast 150-200 years. Because many of these publications have found their wayinto research libraries, today it is possible to study various dimensions ofLatin America using the books, newspapers, official publications, journals,pamphlets, and posters of the period in addition to secondary sources. Even so,a comprehensive collection of publications with research value continues toprove to be an elusive goal because of the complexities of Latin Americansocieties, changing governments, unstable economies, turbulent political life,and social inequities that affect significant portions of the population ofmost countries. Furthermore, much of the documentation that is readilyavailable to libraries emanates from those public or private sectororganizations that compile and distribute publications advancing particularperspectives or arguments of groups in power.

 

Scholarshave long recognized that not all voices important to understanding LatinAmerica are readily accessible in research library collections because ofacquisition difficulties, collection development policies, processing costs,and preservation considerations. Such constraints do not diminish the work ofthe information but rather highlight the fact that relatively few libraries arein a position to collect consistently the documentation from groupsmarginalized for political, social, or geographic reasons. These primarysources, as well as specialized government publications, when combined withsecondary sources such as working papers from research institutes, constitutean invaluable source of documentation. Toward meeting current and futureresearch needs, the Princeton University Libraries have endeavored to acquire,on a selective basis, those publications that provide access to perspectives onand information from such groups involved with different aspects of LatinAmerican life, at the national or provincial and sometimes municipal level.

 

Content: Supplement I

 

Thematerials microfilmed for this Supplement represent additions to Princetonscollections of ephemera: pamphlets, noncommercially produced and distributedserials, working papers of research institutes, fliers, some posters, andgovernment publications. Emphasized throughout are those publications providingsubstantive content, while only samples of documentation containing limitedinformation are included. Such publications are useful in that they provide adirect insight into a particular historic moment, such as a political partycampaign, or document over time the evolution of a movement or condition of asegment of the population. Depending on the content and issuing agencies,serial publications are included either because of a titles particularimportance for documenting a situation or as a sampling within that subjectarea. Posters are included in the collection primarily for the information theyconvey and only occasionally for solely aesthetic value. Governmentpublications are usually intended to record procedures (e.g., for elections); topresent or evaluate government plans that deal primarily with a broad range ofdevelopment issues; to report on the activities of particular agencies within aministry; or to address topics of importance to foreign relations (e.g.,speeches and declarations).

 

Workingpapers from research institutes and activist groups constitute an importantbody of scholarly work often involving micro-level studies. Printings are smalland distribution limited. In many cases, these publications are the only worksthat address topics with scarce or nonexistent primary sources. Particularly inthe areas of gender studies, social movements, human rights and race issues,working papers draw extensively from interviews and related fieldwork. Ininstances of military or other forms of nondemocratic rule, researchorganizations often are the only truly independent scholarly bodies permittedto write and publish without censorship. Under these circumstances, workingpapers become valuable critiques of contemporary events as well as reflectiveessays on the relevant political, social, and economic issues.

 

Selection: Supplement I

 

From awide array of publications, selection has emphasized substantive works ofpotential interest to students and scholars. As resources permitted, everyattempt was made to include as many perspectives on an issue as possible.Special attention to the voz popular ensures the presence of workswritten by, or for, those at the margins of economic, political, and socialpower (e.g., women, unions, minor political parties). Such publications revealthe vibrancy of discussion by the citizenry whether they are residents ofsquatter settlements, members of ecclesiastic base communities, or activists inenvironmental, womens, or ethnic groups. As appropriate, such perspectives arebalanced by the inclusion of available government and other officialagencies publications, and by studies from research institutes. Particularlyfor the subject areas included in this collection, official documents givetopically focused statements representing these agencies points of view. Forsocioeconomic topics, collecting emphasis is on development issues ranging fromfeasibility studies to evaluations.

 

Thecountries best represented are Brazil, Chile, and Peru, with emphasis onmaterials that document socioeconomic and political conditions. Often,extensive coverage exists for the different points of view advocated byinterest groups. For the time period represented for each topical group ofmaterials, researchers will find publications in substantial quantity thatoften address a variety of readers. Such a panorama of perspectives andconsideration of different potential audiences makes the complete countrycollection particularly rewarding for those seeking inclusiveness. Morenarrowly defined coverage is present for Argentina, Mexico, and Bolivia, whereemphasis is similar but not as inclusive. For the remaining Latin Americancountries, coverage is not comprehensive but rather has emphasized particulartopics or periods.

 

Bibliographic Access: SupplementI

 

Bibliographicaccess reflects the electronic environments present in most research librariestoday. Each microfilm title has an RLIN (Research Libraries InformationNetwork) identification number, which is searchable within the RLINcomputerized database; searches are possible by the title as well. With theexception of a few serial titles, all of the titles in the collection alsoappear on OCLC (On-line Computer Library Center). The catalog record for eachtitle includes the subject headings; an extensive listing of corporate bodyadded entries; and, for major publications within each group, author and titleentries. Records for serials include itemized holdings. Hence, for many rollsseveral dozen or more access points exist. For particular large collections,stress is on corporate bodies rather than on citations of individual works,since it is assumed that researchers will benefit most by being able to reviewthe entire body of documentation of a particular group. Serial publicationswith very limited runs that fall within the topical grouping appear on the sameroll with individual titles, and holdings usually are cited.

 

TheSupplement to the Guide, organized by country and therein by title of thecollection filmed, provides the RLIN identification number and PrincetonUniversitys Film M number. A subject approach by topical groups is as follows:

 

Group 11 - Politics:
Campaigns
Current events
Elections
Guerrillas, clandestine opposition
Parties

 

Group 12 - Government:
Foreign relations
Official documents and propaganda
Public policy

 

Group 13 - Socioeconomic conditions:
Communications and media
Economic development
Education
Health and demography
Labor
Transportation
Youth

 

Group 14 - Agriculture:
Agrarian reform
Labor

 

Group 15 - Constitutions, laws, andcodes

 

Group 16 - Human and civil rights

 

Group 17 - Racial groups:
Blacks, Indians

 

Group 18 - Women and gender issues:

 

Group 19 Culture

 

Group 20 - Church and religion:
Catholic, Protestants, Jews

 

Group 21 - Environment and ecology

 

 

Content: Supplement II

Thematerials microfilmed for this Supplement represent additions to Princetonscollections of ephemera: pamphlets, noncommercially produced and distributedserials, working papers of research institutes, fliers, some posters, andgovernment publications. Emphasized throughout are those publications providingsubstantive content, while only samples of documentation containing limitedinformation are included. Such publications are useful in that they provide adirect insight into a particular historic moment, such as a political partycampaign, or document over time the evolution of a movement or condition of asegment of the population. Depending on the content and issuing agencies,serial publications are included either because of a titles particularimportance for documenting a situation or as a sampling within the subjectarea. Posters are included in the collection primarily for the information theyconvey and only occasionally for solely aesthetic value. Governmentpublications are usually intended to record procedures (e.g., for elections);to present or evaluate government plans that deal primarily with a broad rangeof development issues; to report on the activities of particular agencieswithin a ministry; or to address topics of importance to foreign relations(e.g., speeches and declarations).

 

Theimportance of developing civic associations as part of the democratictransition experienced in many Latin American countries from the mid-1980s tothe present cannot be understated. These associations, often sponsored bynongovernmental organizations (NGOs), or in the case of Cuba, groups within theCatholic and Protestant churches, account for a rich variety of documentationcritical for understanding the society and politics of this period. NGOs activein virtually all areas of socioeconomic interest pursue their objectives ofimproving the daily lives through a wide range of programs and projects. In thecourse of such commitment, publications of all types appear, some of whichaddress potential constituents, and others are more generally explanatory aboutthe NGOs missions. Of particular interest to researchers should be thatdocumentation created specifically for interested sectors of the population.These works often reveal much about the state of development, justice, andfractures in society, along with good examples of language use andiconographical representations.

 

Theextensive array of documentation concerning religious life in Cuba merits note.Given the States role in virtually all aspects of society, the development ofalternative options for citizen participation remains limited. With the adventof the Special Period in 1989 and the legalization of holding foreigncurrency in 1993, Catholic and Protestant churches embarked on significantexpansion of activities. These include programs for children, athletic teams,study groups, leadership training, retreats in the countryside, hostingvisiting foreign delegations consisting of church leaders and lay members,medical and food services, and a host of counseling activities. The extensivefiles in this Supplement provide access to the documentation used by thechurches in such activities and programs. Particularly with the Catholicchurch, many provincial publications appear. For Protestant churches the bulkof documentation comes from Habana and the areas immediately surrounding thecapital.

 

Selection: Supplement II

 

From awide array of publications, selection has emphasized substantive works of potentialinterest to students and scholars. As resources permitted, every attempt wasmade to include as many perspectives on an issue as possible. Special attentionto the voz popular ensures the presence of works written by, or for,those at the margins of economic, political, and social power (e.g., women,unions, minor political parties). Such publications reveal the vibrancy ofdiscussion by the citizenry whether they are residents or squatter settlements,or activists in environmental, womens, or ethnic groups. As appropriate, suchperspectives are balanced by the inclusion of available government and otherofficial agencies publications, and by studies from research institutes.Particularly for the subject areas included in this collection, officialdocuments give topically focused statements representing these agencies pointsof view. For socioeconomic topics, collecting emphasis is on development issuesranging from feasibility studies to evaluations.

 

Thecountries best represented are Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Cuba, with smallerholdings for other countries. For Brazil consultation with the Library ofCongress Brazils Popular Groups ongoing microfilm collection enabled theelimination of duplication so that the materials on the Princeton UniversityLibrary film may be considered to complement those of the Library of Congress.

 

Many ofthe collections gather documentation about human rights, women and genderissues, health concerns with an emphasis on AIDS, politics as expressed throughelections and corruption, and religion. In this last area, the collections areenriched by contributions from the extensive holdings of pamphlet, serial andflier publications held by the Princeton Theological Seminary Libraries. In thecase of Cuba, publications from approximately 1985, when State-Church relationsbecame less tense, to the present offer excellent coverage of the churchscontributions to the growth of civil society.

 

Organization: Supplement II

 

Thecollection contains six organizational categories: Politics, Government,Socioeconomic Conditions, Women and Gender Issues, Culture, and Church andReligion. Not all countries have publications from each of these groups.Materials are filmed according to the presence of a sufficient concentration toenable serious research, or for a specific event confined by time (e.g.elections). For some collections filming occurred before complete sets of aserial title were available. This is particularly true for the Cuban churchfilms. It will be necessary to consult subsequently issued film to locatemissing issues.

 

Arrangementon each roll is chronological, with the oldest documents first and the undatedones at the end. Posters are generally filmed last. All issues of a serial aregrouped by title and appear amid other formats of materials within thechronological scheme of organization. Occasionally a single serial titleconstitutes an entire roll; in such cases, holdings information appears in thefirst few frames.

 

Bibliographic Access: SupplementII

 

Bibliographicaccess reflects the electronic environments present in most research librariestoday. Each microfilm title has an RLIN (Research Libraries InformationNetwork) identification number. Titles also appear in WorldCat (OCLC) thusmaking access to the full cataloging record and inventories feasible. For manytitles a detailed inventory exists with the URL provided in the catalogingrecord. In some collections the inventories identify bibliographically eachpublication filmed. Consulting these inventories prior to the microfilm willenhance efficiency and focus closely the quest for information. All titles alsohave a cataloging record that, when fully displayed in the long or full format,records an extensive range of subject headings, corporate body added entries,and in some cases, serial titles.

 

ThisSupplement to the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American MicrofilmCollection (1993) has an overall individual country and regional (i.e.,Latin America) organization, with subject subdivisions, and therein by thetitle of the collection filmed. The RLIN identification number appears for eachtitle. Within each subject category, a range of topics may appear:

 

Group 31 - Politics:
Campaigns
Current events
Elections
Guerrillas, clandestine opposition
Parties

 

Group 32 - Government:
Corruption
Foreign relations
Official documents and propaganda
Public policy

 

Group 33 - Socioeconomic conditions:
Economic development
Education
Health and demography
Labor
Youth

 

Group 36 - Human and civil rights

 

Group 38 - Women and gender issues

 

Group39 - Culture

 

Group 40 - Church and religion:
Catholic, Protestants, Jews

 

 

Content: Supplements III and IV

 

The materialsmicrofilmed for Supplement III and IV represent additions to Princetonscollections of ephemera: pamphlets, noncommercially produced and distributedserials, working papers of research institutes, fliers, some posters, andgovernment publications. Emphasized throughout are those publications providingsubstantive content, while only samples of documentation containing limitedinformation is included. Such publications are useful in that they provide adirect insight into a particular historic moment, such as a political partycampaign, or document over time the evolution of a movement or condition of asegment of the population. Depending on the content and issuing agencies,serial publications are included either because of a titles particularimportance for documenting a situation or as a sampling within the subjectarea. Posters are included in the collection primarily for the information theyconvey and only occasionally for solely aesthetic value. Governmentpublications are usually intended to record procedures (e.g., for elections);to present or evaluate government plans that deal primarily with a broad rangeof development issues; to report on the activities of particular agencieswithin a ministry; or to address topics of importance to foreign relations(e.g., speeches and declarations).

 

The importance ofdeveloping civic associations as part of the democratic transition experiencedin many Latin American countries from the mid-1980s to the present cannot beunderstated. These associations, often sponsored by nongovernmentalorganizations (NGOs), or in the case of Cuba, groups within the Catholic andProtestant churches, account for a rich variety of documentation critical forunderstanding the society and politics of this period. NGOs active in virtuallyall areas of socioeconomic interest pursue their objectives of improving thedaily lives through a wide range of programs and projects. In the course ofsuch commitment, publications of all types appear, some of which addresspotential constituents, and others are more generally explanatory about theNGOs missions. Of particular interest to researchers should be thatdocumentation created specifically for interested sectors of the population.These works often reveal much about the state of development, justice, andfractures in society, along with good examples of language use and iconographicalrepresentations.

 

Selection: Supplements III and IV

 

From awide array of publications, selection has emphasized substantive works ofpotential interest to students and scholars. As resources permitted, everyattempt was made to include as many perspectives on an issue as possible.Special attention to the voz popular ensures the presence of workswritten by, or for, those at the margins of economic, political, and socialpower (e.g., women, unions, minor political parties). Such publications reveal thevibrancy of discussion by the citizenry whether they are residents of squattersettlements, members of ecclesiastic base communities, or activists inenvironmental, womens, or ethnic groups. As appropriate, such perspectives arebalanced by the inclusion of available government and other officialagencies publications, and by studies from research institutes. Particularlyfor the subject areas included in this collection, official documents givetopically focused statements representing these agencies points of view. Forsocioeconomic topics, collecting emphasis is on development issues ranging fromfeasibility studies to evaluations.

 

The countries best represented are Argentina, Chile, Cuba,Mexico, and Peru with smaller holdings for other countries. For Brazil,consultation with the Library of Congress' Brazils Popular Groups ongoingmicrofilm collection enabled the elimination of duplication so that thematerials on the Princeton University Library film may be considered tocomplement those of the Library of Congress.

 

Many of the collections gather documentation aboutsocioeconomic conditions, women and gender issues, politics as expressedthrough elections and corruption, and religion. In this last area, thecollections are enriched by contributions from the extensive holdings ofpamphlet, serial and flier publications held by the Princeton TheologicalSeminary Libraries.

 

Peter T. Johnson
Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain, and Portugal
Princeton University Library, Princeton, NJ

 

 

Organization: Supplements III and IV

 

Supplement III contains five organizational categories:Politics, Socioeconomic Conditions, Women and Gender Issues, Church andReligion, and Indigenous Issues. Supplement IV contains eight organizationalcategories: Politics, Socioeconomic Conditions, Agriculture, Human and CivilRights, Women and Gender Issues, Culture, Church and Religion, and Environmentand Ecology. Not all countries have publications from each of these groups.Materials are filmed according to the presence of a sufficient concentration toenable serious research, or for a specific event confined by time (e.g.,elections). For some collections filming occurred before complete sets of aserial title were available. This is particularly true for the Cuban churchfilms. It will be necessary to consult subsequently issued film to locatemissing issues.

 

Arrangement on each roll is chronological, with the oldestdocuments first and the undated ones at the end. Posters are generally filmedlast. All issues of a serial are grouped by title and appear amid other formatsof materials within the chronological scheme of organization. Occasionally asingle serial title constitutes an entire roll; in such cases, holdingsinformation appears in the first few frames.

 

This Supplement to the Guide to the Princeton UniversityLatin American Microfilm Collection (1993) has an overall individualcountry and regional (i.e. Latin America) organization, with subjectsubdivisions, and therein by the title of the collection filmed. Within eachsubject category, a range of topics may appear.

 

Supplement III

 

Group 51 - Politics:
Campaigns
Current events
Elections
Guerrillas, clandestine opposition

 

Group 53 - Socioeconomic conditions:
Economic development
Education
Health and demography
Labor
Youth

 

Group 58 - Women and gender issues

 

Group 60 - Church and religion:
Catholic, protestants, Jews

 

Group 62 - Indigenous issues

 

Supplement IV

 

Group 71 - Politics:
Campaigns
Current events
Elections
Guerrillas, clandestine opposition

 

Group 73 - Socioeconomic Conditions:
Economic development
Education
Health and demography
Labor
Youth

 

Group 74 - Agriculture:
Agrarian reform
Labor

 

Group 76 - Human and civil rights

 

Group 78 - Women and gender issues

 

Group 79 - Culture

 

Group 80 - Church and religion:
Catholic, Protestants, Jews

 

Group 81 - Environment and ecology

 

Introduction to Supplement V

 

As previous components for this collection, Supplement Vprovides a privileged space to primary sources, mostly of an ephemeral nature,documenting the perspectives of popular and marginalized voices from LatinAmerica. Many of the materials included were produced by organizations directlyinvolved in activism, protest, grassroots organizing, electoral politics, andother forms of political and social mobilization. Others were created byorganizations without an overtly activist or political agenda, but withobjectives linked to important areas of social and economic development. Inmany cases, the collections have also included hard to find secondary sourcessuch as working papers from research institutes, non-governmentalorganizations, and government agencies, as well as relevant ephemeral materialspublished by mainstream and corporate sources.

 

In many respects, Supplement V reflects continuity in areasof collecting that have been given priority for several years. Two importantexamples of this continuity are the collections from Argentina and Cuba. TheArgentine collections add depth and currency to areas such as human rights,womens issues and participation, and elections. The component titled SocioeconomicCrisis and Political Participation in Argentina, 1995-2005 is particularlysubstantial, as it documents in high detail the social response that surroundedand followed the profound economic crisis experienced by Argentineans in 2001.Included in this collection are hundreds of ephemeral materials produced byworkers organizations (including movimientos de trabajadores desocupadosand fbricas recuperadas), piquetero protest movements,neighborhood assemblies, and several other types of civic and politicalorganizations.

 

The collections on Cuban Protestant churches andnon-denominational Christian organizations also build on collectionscollaboratively developed over the years between Princeton University Libraryand Princeton Theological Seminarys Speer Library. The documentation ofreligious activity in that country is of special importance, not only becausethe contents are otherwise inaccessible, but also because they were generatedwithin the few spaces in Cuban society where social organization and civicparticipation maintain a considerable degree of autonomy from the state.

 

Besides continuity, Supplement V reflects an expansion onthe focus of the collections that includes new areas of social and politicaleffervescence in countries such as Bolivia and Venezuela. The scope of theBolivian section is broad and encompasses documentation produced in all regionsof that country in relation to a broad array of issues. The most extensivecomponent, titled Indigenous Peoples, Peasants, and Ethnic Minorities inBolivia, 1970-2005, contains a copious amount of ephemera produced byindigenous and peasant organizations, non-governmental organizations, and theBolivian government at various levels. Even though they can stand alone interms of extension and substance, all of the other Bolivian components (e.g., AgrarianIssues; Children and Youth;Education; Environmentand Ecology; Health and Society; Humanand Civil Rights; Women and Gender Issues) actually complement each other and couldbe seen as a unit.

 

Further reflectingthis expansion, collections from Venezuela contain valuable materials for theanalysis of the recent political, social and economic developments in thatcountry, particularly after the election of Hugo Chvez in 1998. The segmenttitled Alternative Press from Venezuela, 1998-2004, includes dozens ofweekly newspaper-type publications published in Venezuela outside of themainstream and commercial media. The government sponsored many of thesepublications in order to advance its message and political agenda. The Politicsin Venezuela, 1978-2004 collection includes a broader array of formats andperspectives, and includes propaganda distributed during electoral events byall sectors, pamphlets from both small-scale and well-established political andsocial organizations, as well as important political opinion and analysis oftenunavailable elsewhere.

 

The segmentshighlighted above constitute approximately two thirds of all the collections inSupplement V. The other third includes collections from Brazil, CentralAmerica, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Uruguay. The documentationcontains hundreds of unique sources produced and organized from theperspectives of gender, environment and ecology, health and education,religion, and political economy in general.

 

Finally, SupplementV includes four stand-alone serial titles that were added because of theirrelevance to the overall collection and because, for the most part, they havenot been available to researchers in the US and other parts of the world. Noticiassobre todo lo que pasa en el mundo (Buenos Aires), published between 1973and 1974, was a daily publication linked to the Argentinean armed politicalorganization called the Montoneros.

Machete Arte:peridico satrico y de combate (Mexico) is an independent daily of fiery political and culturalcontent published since 1998. The other two stand-alone serials are the daily Tribunade La Habana (Cuba) and Carta Beniana Informativa (Bolivia).

 

FernandoAcosta-Rodriguez
Librarian for Latin American, Iberian and Latino Studies
Princeton University Library, Princeton, NJ

 

Organization and Format:Supplement V

 

The collections inthis Supplement to the Guide to the Princeton University LatinAmerican Microfilm Collection are arranged geographically by country orregion, with subject subdivisions, and therein by the title of the collection.

 

Following are the eight organizational categories containedin this Supplement, along with the corresponding group numbers and subjectsubdivisions.

 

Group 91 Politics:
Campaigns
Current events
Elections

Group 93 - Socioeconomic Conditions:
Economic development
Education

Health and demography
Labor
Youth

 

Group 94 Agriculture:
Agrarian reform
Labor

 

Group 96 - Human and Civil Rights

 

Group 97 - Indigenous Issues

 

Group 98 - Women and Gender Issues

 

Group 100 - Church and Religion:
Catholic, protestant, and Jews

 

Group 101 - Environment and Ecology

 

Below are listed the countries covered in this Supplement,along with their corresponding country code number and the number of reels foreach. The total number of reels in this Supplement is 204.

 

Code: 01
Country: Argentina
Reels: 24

 

Code: 02
Country: Bolivia
Reels: 57

 

Code: 03
Country: Brazil
Reels: 25

 

Code: 05
Country: Central America
Reels: 10

 

Code: 06
Country: Chile
Reels: 11

 

Code: 07
Country: Colombia
Reels: 3

 

Code: 09
Country; Cuba
Reels: 33

 

Code: 10
Country Ecuador
Reels: 3

 

Code: 17
Country: Mexico
Reels: 26

 

Code: 24
Country: Uruguay
Reels: 2

 

Code: 25
Country: Venezuela
Reels: 10

 

Not all countrieshave publications from each of the above groups as materials are filmed basedon the availability of a sufficient concentration to enable serious research,or for a specific event confined by time (e.g., elections). For somecollections filming occurred before complete sets of a serial title wereavailable.

 

Bibliographic Citation

 

A number ofindividual titles with RLIN identification numbers may appear together on oneroll because of the similarity of subject content or issuing agencies. Forciting such titles, the user should always give the collections exact title(appears on the film and in the Guide), and the P number (i.e., country code,topical code, film M #). Format will be as illustrated in the examples below.

 

entirecollection:

 

The 1988Plebiscite in Chile: A Collection of Documents. Wilmington, DE; Scholarly Resources Inc.,1993 (Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection, P0601:3082).

 

as a section ofa collection:

 

Propaganda de apoyoa Pinochet, in The 1988 Plebiscite in Chile: A Collection of Documents.Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1993. (Princeton University LatinAmerican Microfilm Collection, P0601: 3082; roll 1: box 1, folder 2).

 

as a specificitem within a collection:

 

Frente PatriticoManuel Rodrguez-Chile. Declaracin: Sf a la lucha, no al derrotismo y lacapitulacin in The 1988 Plebiscite in Chile: A Collection ofDocuments. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1993. (Princeton UniversityLatin American Microfilm Collection, P0601: 3082; roll 3: box 3, folder 14).

 

as a serialtitle within a collection:

 

El Rebelde 250(March 1988), in The 1988 Plebiscite in Chile: A Collection of Documents.Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources Inc., 1993. (Princeton University LatinAmerican Microfilm Collection, P0601: 3082; roll 3: box 3, folder 15).

 

P0601:3082

P=Princeton;06=country code; 01=topical code; 3082=Film M #.